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Special Note: Garden of Life uses a large number of specially purposed English words, often spelled slightly differently than regular, to make their specific meaning more apparent. We also use a large number of neologisms, specifically constructed for Temple use. All of this type of terminology is defined in several places on the website, here in the Garden of Life website Definitions pages, in the Articles of Organization glossary, and such. If you are viewing this page in a browser which doesn't support full current Unicode coding (such as Microsoft's Internet Explorer - though version 8 is almost there) or if you haven't installed current free Unicode fonts, such as Code2000, many of the phonetic characters, diacritical marks, and symbols in these pages will not show up or will show up as boxes. At the risk of belabouring the extremely obvious, this page is a work in progress, with quite a distance to go before it sleeps. All of these Attributions are from our perspective. We are not putting them forward as objective fact. We welcome all feedback at Defs@gardenoflifetemple.com, though we do not guarantee to process such feedback other than for ascertainable accuracy and usefulness. Thanks.
 

☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ Greek Words ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽

 

Ἀγαπάως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Agapeos) Ἀγαπάως meaning (Unbounded Love)

See also: Agapeos, and Love

Ἀγών ― Ἀγών (for which the Anglicized term is Agon) refers to the comparison of all like things and the judgment of those things as equal to, greater than, or lesser than. Thus also in the special case of contests between the youths of a city, or region, male and female (though grouped separately in the contests), with the 'all like things' clause setting the eligibility for the contests. These competitions, as well as contests and challenges often occured in relation to religious Celebrations. All things in the universe take part in the dynamic of Agon.

See also: Agon

Ἀγορά ― Originally referring to any open 'place of assembly', whether formal or informal, in each community, the term Ἀγορά (for which the Anglicized term is Agora), later developed the dual meaning of 'place of assembly' and community marketplace.

See also: Agora

Ἄξιος ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Akseos) Ἄξιος meaning (perception of balanced feelings reciprocated, deserving)

See also: Akseos, and Love

Ἀλληλοφιλέως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Allelophileos) Ἀλληλοφιλέως meaning (Loving one another as in a group bound by cultural and/or religious ties)

See also: Allelophileos, and Love

αλληλος ― αλληλος (for which the Anglicized term is Allelos), meaning each other, is used to create the term Allele as a designation for one of two or more forms of the DNA sequence of a particular gene.

See also: Allele

Ἀμφιδρόμια ― Ἀμφιδρόμια (for which the Anglicized term is Amphidromia) indicates an Ægean Rite and Celebration in which a newly born child is welcomed and introduced into its family and the community, and receives its public and social name. The friends and relations of the parents were invited to the festival of the Amphidromia, which was held in the evening, and they generally appeared with presents, among which are mentioned the cuttle-fish and the marine polyp (Hesych. and Harpocr s.v.). The house was decorated on the outside with olive branches when the child was a boy, or with garlands of wool when the child was a girl; and a repast was prepared, at which, if we may judge from a fragment of Ephippus in Athenaeus (IX p370; comp. II p65), the guests must have been rather merry. The child was then carried round the fire by the nurse, and thus, as it were, presented to the Gods of the house and to the family, and at the same time received its name, to which the guests were witnesses (Isaeus, De Pyrrhi Haered. p34 s30 Bekker). The carrying of the child round the hearth was the principal part of the solemnity, from which its name was derived. But the Scholiast on Aristophanes (Lysistr. 758) derives its name from the fact that the guests, whilst the name was given to the child, walked or danced around it. [In part from: William Smith, D.C.L., LL.D.: A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities - John Murray, London, 1875. For more information: see also ]

See also: Amphidromia

Ανακύκλωση ― Ανακύκλωση, for which the Anglicized term is Anakyklosis) (1) the cyclic movement of time; (2) a historical cycle; (3) macrocosmic cycle of eternal return

See also: Anakyklosis

Ἀνάμνησις ― (Ἀνάμνησις (for which the Anglicized term is Anamnesis) refers literally to the 'loss of forgetfulness', rthus indicating reminiscence or recollection; most often in the context of Reincarnation indicating the act of the Soul recalling knowledge from past lives. The Ægean formulation of this theory is generally attributed to Socrates. Plato reports that Socrates delineates a theory of Reincarnation, in his response to rhetorical questioning from Meno. When asked something along the lines of: "if you don't know any of the attributes, properties, and/or other descriptive markers of any kind that help signify what something is (physical or otherwise), you won't recognize it, even if you actually come across it. So how will you carry out this search for the nature of virtue, or even set up the parameters of the search?" Socrates suggests that the soul is immortal, and repeatedly incarnated; knowledge is actually in the soul from eternity, but that each time the soul is incarnated its knowledge is forgotten in the shock of birth. What one perceives to be learning, then, is actually the recovery of what one has forgotten. (Once it has been brought back it is true belief, to be turned into genuine knowledge by understanding.) And thus Socrates (and Plato) sees himself, not as a teacher, but as a midwife, aiding with the birth of knowledge that was already there in the student.

See also: Anamnesis

Ἀνάγκη ― In the context of the Ægean Pantheons, Ἀνάγκη (for which the Anglicized term is Ananke) a Goddess whose purview is the Inevitable, and the Necessary, and to some extent Destiny.

See also: Ananke

Ἀντέρως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Anteros) Ἀντέρως meaning (Reciprocated Sexual Love)

See also: Anteros, and Love

Ἀφροδισίων ― Ἀφροδισίων (for which the Anglicized term is Apfrodiseon) has a meaning of a coming together centered around sexual intercourse, always plural, but used of all female, all male, and mixed gender occurances.

See also: Apfrodiseon

Ἀφροδίσιος ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Apfrodiseos) Ἀφροδίσιος meaning (Sexual Attraction Arousal)

See also: Apfrodiseos, and Love

Ἀπόδειξις ― A shewing forth

Ἄσκησις ― Ἄσκησις (for which the Anglicized term is Askesis) (1) process of training, discipline, and practice; (2) habitual practice of self-discipline; (3) freedom derived from ethical praxis rather than theorizing

See also: Askesis

Βασιλεύς ― Βασιλεύς (for which the Anglicized term is Basileus) and the comparable word Βασιλίννα (Basilinna meaning ~Queen) are Greek terms and titles that have been used to indicate various types of monarchs throughout history (Astory?) as we know it. It is perhaps best known in the Western World in titles used by Byzantine rulers, but also has a longer history of use for persons of authority and sovereigns in ancient Greece, as well as for the kings of modern Greece. The plural form of Βασιλεύς is Βασιλεῖς (Basileis). The word Basileus in it's oldest attestations may have been written as Qa-si-re-u (The first written instance of this word is found on the baked clay tablets discovered in excavations of Mycenaean palaces originally destroyed by fire. The tablets are dated from around the 15th century BCE to the 11th century BCE. They were inscribed with the Linear B script, which was deciphered by Michael Ventris in 1952 and corresponds to a very early form of Greek.) and its original meaning was "chieftain" (in one particular tablet the chieftain of the guild of bronzesmiths is referred to as Qa-si-re-u). The word can be contrasted with Ϝαναξ (Wanax), another word used more specifically for "king" and usually meaning 'High King', 'Emperor', and/or perhaps 'overking'. One intriguing possibility is that with the collapse of Mycenaean society (for whatever reasons, Natural and Social, hopefully eventually to be determined with some authenticity), the position of Ϝαναξ (Wanax) would have disappeared, and the Basileis (the plural form) were left as the topmost officials in Greek society. This has all sorts of implications in the correlations of actual meanings of words used and the effects the usage may or may not have on the playing out of the actualities? In the works of Homer Ϝαναξ (Wanax) appears, in the later form Ἄναξ (Anax), mostly in descriptions of Ζεύς (Zeus - in His postition as King of the Gods) and of a very few human monarchs. Much more information may be found at the Wikipedia articles on these terms, interlinked from that point.

See also: Basileus

Βασιλίννα ― Βασιλίννα (for which the Anglicized term is Basilinna) Queen

See also: Basilinna

Βωμός ― When the term Βωμός (for which the Anglicized term is Bomos) is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool and/or Focus it generally refers to a type of raised altar, frequently made of stone, or in some cases a type of supporting stand for some item or items utilized in a Werking.

See also: Bomos

Δᾳδοῦχος ― Δᾳδοῦχος (for which the Anglicized term is Dadoukhos) with a general meaning of torch bearer. Δᾳδοῦχος is an epithet of Artemis, Hek'kate, and notably of Demeter seeking her lost daughter (Persephone) with a torch or double torches. It was also the title of an officiant (ranking after the Hierophant) at the Ἐλευσίνια Μυστήρια (the Eleusinian Mysteries), an office at times, inherited through several Athenian families lineages.

See also: Dadoukhos

Δεοἀγαπάως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Deoagapeos) Δεοἀγαπάως meaning (Love of and or by Divine Forms and/or Forces)

See also: Deoagapeos, and Love

Δῶρον ― Δῶρον (for which the Anglicized term is Doron) (1) a present; (2) a sacrifice, gift, offering

See also: Doron

Ειδωλον ― Ειδωλον (for which the Anglicized term is Eidolon) is a technical Mægickal term which has a number of similar meanings indicating variations on: image, idol, double, apparition, phantom, ghost, the astral double of a living being; a phantom-double of the human form; a shade or perispirit (In Spiritism the 'Perispirit' is the subtle body that is used by the spirit to connect with the perceptions created by the brain. The term is found among the extensive terminology originally devised by Allan Kardec in his books about Spiritism.); the kamarupa (in Theosophy Kamaloka is a semi-material plane, subjective and invisible to humans, where disembodied "personalities", the astral forms, called Kamarupa remain until they fade out from it by the complete exhaustion of the effects of the mental impulses that created these eidolons of human and animal passions and desires.) after death, before its disintegration. The phantom can appear under certain conditions to survivors of the deceased. The term Eidolon was referrenced by Edgar Allan Poe in his poem 'Dreamland'. It was earlier used as the subject of Walt Whitman's 'Eidolons'. The term Eidolon may also indicate an attribute that references a particular Deity but does not encompass that Deity's actual essence. For example, the Magus Card, Loki, fiber optic impulses, and the Trickster, may be considered by some as Eidolons of a Deity more often called Hermes or Mercury. Any and/or all of these attributes may evoke Hermetic energies and resonances; none of them capture the essence of the totality of Hermes. Another meaning may refer to a masque, alias and/or vessel that a Deity may choose to operate within or through, which vessel may also be an individual, or group.

See also: Eidolon

Εἶδος ― Εἶδος (for which the Anglicized term is Eidos) The Greek concept of Form and Forms evolved from a state before the attested language where Form was represented by a number of words mainly having to do with sight and the processing of vision: the sight or appearance of a thing. As the theories moved into what is called the Classical period Forms started being typified as are essences of various objects and abstract concepts: they are viewed as being that without which a thing would not be the kind of thing it is. They are considered to have independent existence from the various exemplors which one might come across in the consensus reality, and to contain the immutable genuine nature of each thing.

See also: Eidos

Έκ-στασις ― Έκ-στασις (for which the Anglicized term is Ekastasis) indicates a standing outside of one's self, particularly one's normal sense of self, and perhaps out of the consensus reality's time-space framework, thus correlated with the ecstatic experience which it has given name to in modern English. This may be considered with and contrasted to Ένστασις (for which the Anglicized term is Enstasis) which is to stand inside onself, in the sense of full consciousness and true Gnosos, which may be considered as a stage of Spiritual growth and/or a praxis toward such.

See also: Ekastasis

Ἐλευθερία ― Ἐλευθερία (for which the Anglicized term is Eleutheria) generally pronounced [elefθe'ria] indicates the concept and/or personified essence of Freedom and Liberty. And as such plays an important role in many systems of philosophy, of course interpreted in many ways, though generally far removed from the interpretations critiqued in George Orwell's work. In addition to being a Deity name in its own right, Ἐλευθερία was also an epithet applied to other Goddesses, most frequently Artemis, especially in her Anatolian Traditions.

See also: Eleutheria

ἐνέργεια

Έκ-στασις ― Ένστασις (for which the Anglicized term is Enstasis) indicates the state of standing inside onself, in the sense of full consciousness and true Gnosos, which may be considered as a stage of Spiritual growth and/or a praxis toward such.

See also: Enstasis

εν-Θεος ― εν-Θεος (for which the Anglicized term is Entheos) Meaning Divinity within Us.

See also: Entheos

Ἐνθουσιασμός ― Ἐνθουσιασμός (for which the Anglicized term is Enthusiasmos) indicates exhalted inspiration, enthusiasm, frenzy, a feeling of "The Deity is within me"; being a vessel for a Deity, or for one's own Deity Essence. The effect is often enhanced or produced by certain kinds of music.

See also: Enthusiasmos

Ἐποχή ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Epokshê) Ἐποχή meaning cessation or stoppage; hence, in the philosophy of the skeptics, the suspension of judgment. Only by refusing either to affirm or to deny the truth of what we cannot know, they supposed, can we achieve the ataraxia of a peaceful mind.

See also: Epokshê

Ἐποπτεία ― Ἐποπτεία (for which the Anglicized term is Epoptia) highest grade of initiation at the Eleusinian mysteries,

See also: Epoptia

Ἔρομανία ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Eromanea) Ἔρομανία meaning (Sexual Effectuated Desire Obsessive to the point of Madness)

See also: Eromanea, and Love

Ἔρως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Eros) Ἔρως meaning (Ardent Sexual Effectuated Desire)

See also: Eros, and Love

Ἐρωτιάω ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Erotao) Ἐρωτιάω meaning (Lovesickness)

See also: Erotao, and Love

Ἐρωτώτερος ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Erototeros) Ἐρωτώτερος meaning (Liking of things, inanimate objects, unable to reciprocate)

See also: Erototeros, and Love

Ἐξηγητὰς ― Ἐξηγητὰς (for which the Anglicized term is Exegetai) (1) explainers; (2) interpreter of Sacred law

See also: Exegetai

Ύγίεια

Γνώμων ― When considered in the context of mathmatical theory is typified in the writings of Heron of Alexandria, a 1st century AD Greek mathematician, who defined a Γνώμων (for which the Anglicized term is Gnomon) as "any figure which, when added to an original figure, leaves the resultant figure similar to the original." This is the symbol of growth by accretion, or evolution from a seed point. From the ground plan of a Sanatana Dharma temple to the Throne of Osiris, this principle of gnomic expansion, or growth by accumulative increase, has been used throughout history to represent the unfoldment of space/time. The term Gnomon is utilized in the calculation of Figurate numbers, and Figurate numbers were a component of Pythagorean geometry, since Pythagoras is credited with codifying the theories about them and the notion that these numbers are generated using a Gnomon or basic unit. The Gnomon is the piece added to a figurate number to transform it to the next larger one.

See also: Gnomon

Γνώμων ― The term Γνώμων (for which the Anglicized term is Gnomon) when used in the context of engineering and technological parts, is the part of a sundial that casts the shadow.

See also: Gnomon

Ηαιλι

Ἑλλήνιον ― Ἑλλήνιον (for which the Anglicized term is Hellenion) a Greek temple set in a foreign land

See also: Hellenion

Ἑλλήνισμος ― Ἑλλήνισμος (for which the Anglicized term is Hellenismos), meaning Hellenism or Grecism, may be considered to be the devotion to and/or reutilization of ancient Greek thought, customs, or styles; the term also may indicate the body of humanistic and classical ideals most often associated with ancient Greece and including reason, the pursuit of knowledge and the arts, moderation, civic responsibility, and bodily development; Hellenismos is also the name coined by the Emperor Julian to describe Hellenic polytheism, one of the first figures to attempt to revive the religion after the establishment of the temporal power of xTianity, to refer to the traditional religion of the Greeks and all those who embraced their religious culture; And of course Hellenismos is the name chosen by the modern movement which attempts to reconstruct the Hellenic religion, and to reclaim and use this name in a religious, inclusive sense within the context of the modern world. (The word also has other unrelated meanings in the modern usage of the Greek language.)

See also: Hellenismos

Ἕνα καί Νέα ― Ἕνα καί Νέα (for which the Anglicized term is Hena Kai Nea) meaning 'the old and the new'; its most common usage probably was as a term indicating the last day of each month an Attic festival calendar, this monthly last day festival appears to have been for Hek'kate in most places.

See also: Hena Kai Nea

Ἑρμῆς ὁ Τρισμέγιστος ― Ἑρμῆς ὁ Τρισμέγιστος (for which the Anglicized term is Hermes Trismegistus) meaning "thrice-great Hermes", established in the ancient Greek culture as a separate God-Form from Hermes, or Djehuti for that matter, he is considered to have attributes shared by both Deities, but perhaps in more concentrated form. Both Djehuti and Hermes were Gods of writing and of magic in their respective cultures. Thus, the Greek God of interpretive communication was combined with the Egyptian God of wisdom as a patron of astrology and alchemy. In addition, both Gods were psychopomps; guiding souls to the afterlife. And there is also a connection with the Egyptian Priest and Polymath Imhotep

See also: Hermes Trismegistus

Ἐταῖραι ― In ancient Greek society, (Ἐταῖραι (for which the Anglicized term is Hetaerae) [singular: Ἐταῖρα (for which the Anglicized term is Hetaera)] were independent and often influential women who wore distinctive attire, in part to identify themselves. The Hetaerae and the Hetaeroi for that matter, were full citizens and thus had to pay taxes (well, it often seems there's a down side to everything). Courtesan is probably the closest identifying term that modern Western civilization individuals can come up with in understanding these people and the place they held in society, but the actuality went far beyond this. The Hetaerae were renowned for their achievements in the Arts, particularly dance and music, and honoured for their intellectual pursuits, as well as for their physical Beauty, and sexual expertise. There is adequate evidence that, unlike most other women in Greek society of those times, Hetaerae were often formally educated. Hetaerae were the only women who could, if they desired, actively take part in the Symposia, and their opinions and beliefs were respected by men, on an equal basis. In certain fields of study and knowledge, particular Hetaerae would be sought out to explicate their views. The male form of the word, Ἑταἔρως (for which the Anglicized term is Hetaeros) (plural Ἑταἔροί (for which the Anglicized term is Hetaeroi), signified male companions. Most famously, it referred to Alexander the Great's bodyguard cavalry unit.

See also: Hetaerae and Hetaeroi

Ἑταἔροί ― In ancient Greek society, (Ἑταἔροί (for which the Anglicized term is Hetaeroi) were often influential companions, and generally young men who wore distinctive attire, in part to identify themselves. The Hetaeroi and the Hetaerae for that matter, were full citizens and thus had to pay taxes (well, it often seems there's a down side to everything). Courtesan is probably the closest identifying term that modern Western civilization individuals can come up with in understanding these people and the place they held in society, but the actuality went far beyond this. The Hetaeroi were renowned for their achievements in the Arts, particularly the athletic arts and the martial arts, but also dance and music, and honoured for their intellectual pursuits, as well as for their physical Beauty, and sexual expertise. The female form of the word, Ἐταῖρα (for which the Anglicized term is Hetaera) [plural Ἐταῖραι (for which the Anglicized term is Hetaerae)], signified female companions. Most famously, it referred to Phryne.

See also: Hetaeroi and Hetaerae

Ἑταιρεία ― Ἑταιρεία (for which the Anglicized term is Hetaireia) (1) society of friends; (2) a club

See also: Hetaireia

Ἱέρεια ― Ἱέρεια (for which the Anglicized term is Hiereia) Priestess. Aeolian - Φαυόφορος (for which the Anglicized term is Phauophoros) meaning Light-Keeper

See also: Hiereia

Ἱερόκῆρυξ ― Ἱερόκῆρυξ (for which the Anglicized term is Hierokeryx) and indicates the herald who announces a ritual by calling for silence.

See also: Hierokeryx

Ἱέρων ― Ἱέρων (for which the Anglicized term is Hieron) (1) filled with divine power; (2) a sanctuary

See also: Hieron

Ἱεροφάντης ― Ἱεροφάντης (for which the Anglicized term is Hierophantes) (1) displayer of holy things; (2) he who explains Sacred things

See also: Hierophantes

Ἱερός ― Ἱερός (for which the Anglicized term is Hieros) (1) Sacred; (2) consecrated to a Deity

See also: Hieros

Ιερός Γάμος ― Ιερός Γάμος (for which the Anglicized term is Hieros Gamos), and indicates a consummated sexual occurance of a Sacred Nature, (1) holy wedding; (2) Sacred marriage; (3) a coupling of a Deity and a human

See also: Hieros Gamos

Ἰδέριως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Ideros) Ἰδέριως meaning (Love from first sight)

See also: Ideros, and Love

Ἴμερος ― Imeros as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Ἴμερος meaning longing or yearning after, especially in the sense of passion, love, lust;

See also: Imeros, and Love

Κατὰβαίσως ― Κατὰβαίσως (for which the Anglicized term is Katabasis) (1) going underneath; (2) descent into the underworld. Κατὰβαίσως may also be used to indicate a traveling from the interior of a region to the coast, which seems to further inform the metaphor.

See also: Katabasis

Κατήχησις ― Κατήχησις (for which the Anglicized term is Katekhesis) instruction by word of mouth: generally, instruction; tradition by instruction, narrative, precept,

See also: Katekhesis

Καθαρμός ― Καθαρμός (for which the Anglicized term is Katharmos) ritual cleansing, purification

See also: Katharmos

Κάθαρσις ― Κάθαρσις (for which the Anglicized term is Katharsis) purification, purgation

See also: Katharsis

Χαίρως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Kheiros) Χαίρως rejoicing, gladness, delight

See also: Kheiros

Χερνῐβεῖον ― (Χερνῐβεῖον (for which the Anglicized term is Khernibeionas) The vessel holding the khernips is called a khernibeion or a perirranterion.

See also: Khernibeionas

Χἐρνιψ ― Χἐρνιψ (for which the Anglicized term is Khernips) (1) purifying water; (2) lustral water, to wash one's hands before ritual. The vessel holding the khernips is called a khernibeion or a perirranterion.

See also: Khernips

Χωροφιλία ― Khorophileos as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Χωροφιλία meaning Love of a place

See also: Khorophileos, and Love

Χθόνιοί ― Χθόνιοί (for which the Anglicized term is Khthonoi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Earth and the regions under the surface of the Earth.

See also: Khthonoi

Κίστη ― Κίστη (for which the Anglicized term is Kiste) basket (used for Sacred things)

See also: Kiste

Κλεηδών ― Κλεηδών (for which the Anglicized term is Kledon) accidentally significant utterance (a type of omen)

See also: Kledon

Κλᾳδουχοί ― Κλᾳδουχοί (for which the Anglicized term is Kleidoukhoi) key holder

See also: Kleidoukhoi

Κινητικός

Κοινόν ― Κοινόν (for which the Anglicized term is Koinon) common thing, communal, and interpreted as "commonwealth", "league" or "federation" were a number of associations of cities in ancient and early modern Greek history. [Plural Κοινά (Koina)]

See also: Koinon

Κῶμος ― Κῶμος (for which the Anglicized term is Komos) and indicate a ritualistic drunken procession or communal ritual carouse (drunken merrymaking) performed by revelers in ancient Greece, a riotous procession in honor of a Deity, whose participants were known as Komasts. The Κῶμος differs from other processions [such as the Πομπή (for which the Anglicized term is Pompe) and the Χορηγοί (for which the Anglicized term is Khoregoi), which were planned and led, according to exact directions.] in that the emphasis was on spontaneity and there is no leader, script, or rehersal. In one exemplary event Ἀλκιβιάδης Κλεινίου Σκαμβωνίδης (for which the Anglicized name is Alcibiades) famously gate-crashes the Συμπόσιον (for which the Anglicized term is Symposium) while carousing in a Κῶμος (komos). The emphasis is on revelry and is usually nocturnal and [Plural Κomoi (Komoi)]

See also: Komos

χῶρος

Κόσμος ― Κόσμος (for which the Anglicized term is Kosmos) The entire manifested Cosmos, in its harmonious orderly arrangement, including the interplay between order and entropy, matter and dark matter, matter and anti-matter, unified and disparate forces, unified and faceted Consciousness. A super-order, including our known Universe, and all other Universes and Dimensional configurations.

See also: Kosmos

Κόσμος Αίσθητως ― Κόσμος Αίσθητως (for which the Anglicized term is Kosmos Aisthetos) (1) empirical or phenomenal world; (2) the world perceived by our senses

See also: Kosmos Aisthetos

Κόσμος Νοητος ― Κόσμος Νοητος (for which the Anglicized term is Kosmos Noetos) (1) transcendental world; (2) spiritual world; (3) intelligible world

See also: Kosmos Noetos

Ξενία ― Kseinia as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Ξενία whose meaning is sometimes simplified to be just hospitality, was an extremely important practice in Ancient Greece. It was an almost ritualized friendship formed between a host and his guests, governed by a complex system of rules, both written and unwritten, who could previously have been strangers. The host fed and provided quarters for the guest, who was expected to repay only with gratitude. Many variations of the concept are conveyed in the body of stories of the early Ægean cultures. This social contract type of arrangement was also quite prominent in many of the other early Human civilizations, in Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Ægypt, the Indus Valley, China, and so forth.

See also: Kseinia, and Social Contract

Ξεινοβάκχηος ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Kseinobekheos) meaning (Romantic and/or Sexual Love for Strangers and/or the Strange) Ξεινοβάκχηος meaning (Romantic and/or Sexual Love for Strangers and/or the Strange)

See also: Kseinobekheos, and Love

Κυκεών ― Κυκεών (for which the Anglicized term is Kykeon) mixture of water, barley and herbs

See also: Kykeon

Κύκλος ― Κύκλος (for which the Anglicized term is Kyklos) (1) a circle; (2) a cycle

See also: Kyklos

Κυμβαλα ― Κυμβαλα (for which the Anglicized term is Kymbala) cymbals

See also: Kymbala

Κύπρίδιος ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Kyprideos) Κύπρίδιος meaning (Love originating in Aesthetics)

See also: Kyprideos, and Love

Λίκνον ― When the term Λίκνον (for which the Anglicized term is Liknon), is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool and/or Focus it generally refers to a winnowing fan or basket, actual or stylized, which will be used in Werkings.

See also: Liknon

Λοιβή ― Λοιβή (for which the Anglicized term is Loebe) liquid offering or libation (specifically one where the entire offering is given to the Gods)

See also: Loebe

Λύδοἔρως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Ludoeros) Λύδοἔρως meaning (Sexual Love played as a game, the Game of Love, Playfulness)

See also: Ludoeros, and Love

Μανἔρως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Maneros) Μανἔρως meaning (Highly Emotional Sexual based Love)

See also: Maneros, and Love

Μάθησις ― Μάθησις (for which the Anglicized term is Mathesis) learning, the getting of knowledge, desire of learning

See also: Mathesis

Μετεμψύχωσις ― Μετεμψύχωσις (for which the Anglicized term is Metempsychosis) with a meaning roughly corresponding to the common English phrase "transmigration of the soul" and includes a variety of forms of reincarnation; after death, after previous incarnations, in different types of cycles. In some cases the incarnations may be human, animal, or some other type of entity though emphasising the continuity of the soul, not the flesh. The term has been used by modern philosophers such as Kurt Gödel and has entered the English language. Another Greek term sometimes used synonymously is palingenesis, "being born again". The entire concept brings into play some sets of near universal early Human ideas: Ægyptian, Sumerian, Sanatana Dharma, Tibetan, Daoist, Shinto, American First Nations, Keltic, Nordic and others, that entities, usually Human and Divine are made up of different components, some combinations of which are more likely to stay together continually, or in a series of incarnations; and other components which are generated for a specific incarnation and only have associations with that one. As an aside, Μετεμψύχωσις has also been explored in speculative philosophy and fiction in terms of the idea of minds switching bodies either temporarily or permanently, which is often called Mind-swapping, or switching, or may be more accurately noted as Body-switching.

See also: Metempsychosis

Μετάπλαεσμως

Μητρίζω ― Μητρίζω (for which the Anglicized term is Metrizo) meaning to be possessed by the Mother of the Gods

See also: Metrizo

Μητριάζω ― Μητριάζω (for which the Anglicized term is Metriazo) indicates a state of worship for and Celebration of the Rites of the Mother of the Gods

See also: Metriazo

Μύησις ― Μύησις (for which the Anglicized term is Myesis) The main Greek term for initiation, myesis, is also derived from the verb myein, which means "to close." It refers to the closing of the eyes which was possibly symbolic of entering into darkness prior to reemerging and receiving light and to the closing the lips which was possibly a reference to the vow of silence taken by all initiates.

See also: Myesis

Μυστήριον ― Μυστήριον (for which the Anglicized term is Mysteria) (1) mysteries; (2) sacraments

See also: Mysteria

Μύστις ― Μυστες (for which the Anglicized term is Mystes) (plural mystai) an initiate; one initiated into the Mysteries

See also: Mystes

Μύστικος ― Μύστικος (for which the Anglicized term is Mystikos) (1) seeing with the eyes closed; (2) a mystic

See also: Mystikos

Μυθος ― Μυθος (for which the Anglicized term is Mythos) (1) a traditional tale, story or narrative; (2) a legend

See also: Mythos

Ναός ― Ναός (for which the Anglicized term is Naos) may refer to a Temple in a general manner, but more often this term is used to indicate an interior portion of a Temple, or a constructed shrine, which may stay in a 'Holy of Holies' placement within a Temple or may be portable, so that the votive figures and accoutrements of a particular Tradition, may be carried around without actually being totally (or even partially in some cases) exposed to the eyes of the uninitiated. These figures may be representational statuary of particular Deities, and/or objects Sacred to the Tradition. The Ναός refers to the enclosure, (sometimes multiple nested enclosures) itself which contains the items. Some Traditions developed patterns of processional pathways to other Temples, to Sacred Rivers or High Places, and/or cirumambulations returning to the starting point. In some cases there was no particular destination, since the potency of the process was considered to lie in the act of carrying the figures through the territory so that the populace could see either them or the enclosure which itself had become Sacred to the Tradition.

See also: Naos

Νέμεσις ― Νέμεσις (for which the Anglicized term is Nemesis) (1) to give what is due; (2) divine vengeance or retribution

See also: Nemesis

Νεωκόρος ― Νεωκόρος (for which the Anglicized term is Neokoros) (pl. neokoroi) (1) temple sweeper or caretaker; (2) a temple servant

See also: Neokoros

Νόμος ― Νόμος (for which the Anglicized term is Nomos) (1) law; (2) custom; (3) tradition

See also: Nomos

Νόμος Ἀρχαῖος ― Νόμος Ἀρχαῖος (for which the Anglicized term is Nomos Arkhaios) ancient tradition, law, or customs

See also: Nomos Arkhaios

Νουμήνία ― Νουμήνία (for which the Anglicized term is Noumenia) the new moon (first visible sliver after the dark moon)

See also: Noumenia

Νοῦς ― Νοῦς (for which the Anglicized term is Nous) (1) mind, intellect; (2) cosmic mind

See also: Nous

Οἰνοχόος ― Οἰνοχόος (for which the Anglicized term is Oenokhoos) wine pourer

See also: Oenokhoos

Οἶκος ― Οἶκος (for which the Anglicized term is Oikos) (1) house, household; (2) a family [plural Οἶκοι (Oikoi)]

See also: Oikos

Ὀλολύγε ― Ὀλολύγε (for which the Anglicized term is Ololyge) indicates a crying out, shouts of exaltation, and/or ululation, within a ritual context, normally, though not always by the women involved, there are associations to the breathings and sounds to aide in the birthing process. Like the Paean, it usually represents a joyous state.

See also: Ololyge

Ὀλύμπιος ― Ὀλύμπιος (for which the Anglicized term is Olympioi) (1) the Olympians; (2) the Shining Ones

See also: Olympioi

Ὄμευνος ― Ὄμευνος (for which the Anglicized term is Omeunos) a partner of the bed, consort, one who sits by one's side

See also: Omeunos

Ὄργια ― Ὄργια (for which the Anglicized term is Orgia) is the plural form, Ὄργιον (Orgion) being the singular. But the reference is to any secret rites, and ecstatic form of worship characteristic of some mystery Traditions. The Ὄργιον (Orgion) is in particular widely known and celebrated ceremony of Dionysos, celebrated widely in Arcadia, featuring unrestrained masked dances by torchlight and animal sacrifice by means of random slashing that evoked the God's own rending and suffering at the hands of the Titans.

See also: Orgia

Ὄργιαφάντης ― Ὄργιαφάντης (for which the Anglicized term is Orgiophantes) a teacher or revealer of secret rites

See also: Orgiophantes

Οὐσία ― Οὐσία (for which the Anglicized term is Ousia) (1) being or beingness; (2) essence, denoting that which is shared: essence, form, and nature,

See also: Ousia

Παιάν ― Παιάν (for which the Anglicized term is Paean) a hymn of praise or thanksgiving, song of triumph, any solemn song or chant

See also: Paean

Παλιγγενεσία ― Παλιγγενεσία (for which the Anglicized term is Palingenesia) (1) rebirth; (2) renewal or regeneration; (3) restoration of fortune, continual re-creation, restoration after exile

See also: Palingenesia

Παννύχιος ― Παννύχιος (for which the Anglicized term is Pannykhios) an all night festival

See also: Pannykhios

Πανσπερμία ― Πανσπερμία (for which the Anglicized term is Panspermia) (or pankarpia) (1) all seeds; (2) mixture of fruits brought to the dead (the fruit is eaten, the seeds are left); (3) mixture of fresh water, oil, and fruits left for Zeus Herkeios Patroos in a pantry or cupboard

See also: Panspermia

Παράπρᾶξις ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Paraprakhis) Παράπρᾶξις which comes from Παρά (para-) meaning "beside" or "aside" and Πρᾶξις (praxis) meaning "a doing, transaction, business."

See also: Paraprakhis

Παρρἡσία ― Παρρἡσία (for which the Anglicized term is Parrhesia) meaning literally "to speak everything" and by extension "to speak freely," "to speak boldly," or "boldness." It implies not only freedom of speech, but the obligation to speak the truth for the common good, even at personal risk. freedom of speech or frankness; (2) fearless confidence and boldness; (3) cheerful courage

See also: Parrhesia

Πείθως

Φάρμακος ― Φάρμακος (for which the Anglicized term is Pharmakos) and referencing the central figure in a complex scapegoat scenario which was performed in times of disaster to expiate community guilt. The interesting thing about this term is its interplay with Φάρμακον, only one letter different and seemingly tied to the other word, according to numerous essays and theories, in a variety of ways.

See also: Pharmakos

Φάρμακον ― Φάρμακον (for which the Anglicized term is Pharmakon) a complex term meaning sacrament, remedy, poison, talisman, cosmetic, perfume or intoxicant. From this, the modern term "pharmacology" emerged.

See also: Pharmakon

Φιλαδελφίος ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Philadelpheos) Φιλαδελφίος meaning Love either between Siblings who are generally well disposed towards each other or Love between people which emulates such a Sibling bonding.

See also: Philadelpheos, and Love

Φιλαλληλίος ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Philallelos) Φιλαλληλίος meaning (Mutual Affection)

See also: Philallelos, and Love

Φιλέως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Phileos) Φιλέως represents the bonds of Friendship, deep Camaraderie.

See also: Phileos, and Love

Φιλοθηρίος ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Philothereos) Φιλοθηρίος meaning (Romantic and/or Sexual Love based on the Appeal of the Chase)

See also: Philothereos, and Love

Πραγματος ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Pragmatos) Πραγματος meaning (Pragmatic Love, Marriages of Convenience)

See also: Pragmatos, and Love

Πρᾶξις ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Praksis) Πρᾶξις meaning something being done, doings, transactions, procedures. Sometimes there is an inference of a way of doing things and/or how they are done.

See also: Praksis

Προσκηδής ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Proskedes) Προσκηδής meaning general kindness, affection, tendency to bring people into alliance, a strong positive emotion of regard and affection, Simple Affection as with acquaintances or the general population.

See also: Proskedes, and Love

Προτέλειος ― Προτέλειος (for which the Anglicized term is Proteleios) before consecration, preliminaries

See also: Proteleios

Πρωτογενοι ― Πρωτογενοι (for which the Anglicized term is Protogenoi) First Born Deities of this Kosmos; each with a purview of one of the basic components of the universe which emerged at the beginning, including: Earth, Air, Sea, Sky, Fresh Water, Underworld, Darkness, Night, Light, Day, Pleasure, Pain, Sleep, Life, Death, Procreation, Order, Khaos, Entropy, and Time.

See also: Protogenoi

Πρύτανις ― Πρύτανις (for which the Anglicized term is Prytanis) president, by extension a member of a set of directing council for an organization

See also: Prytanis

X

Ψυχή ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Psykhe) Ψυχή breath, especially as the sign of life, life, soul, spirit

See also: Psykhe

Ψυχοπομπός ― Ψυχοπομπός (for which the Anglicized term is Psykhopompos) (1) conductor of souls to the place of the dead; (2) the spiritual guide of a (living) person's soul

See also: Psykhopompos

Ψυχά ― Ψυχά (for which the Anglicized term is Psykhe) (1) the soul; (2) the world or cosmic soul

See also: Psykhe

Φυλάσσειν ― Φυλάσσειν (Psylassein) is an Ægean term which indicates: the verb 'to keep' and by extension, perhaps that which is to be kept,

See also: Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Πτυχή ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Ptykhe) Πτυχή meaning foldness like in threefold, fourfold, fivefold and so forth, particularly in relation to an object, of art or otherwise, note the initial pT sound similar perhaps to the pT sound with which the name of the Ægyptian Deity Form Ptah. commenced; compare to: Τρεισκαιδεκαπλασίων (Treiskaidekaplasion) thirteen-fold A polyptych ( from the Greek language polu-"many" and ptychÁ"fold") generally refers to a painting (usually panel painting which is divided into multiple sections, or panels. There is a different view when the wings are closed. The terminology that follows is in relevance to the number of panels integrated into a particular piece of work: "diptych describes a two-part work of art; "triptych describes a three-part work; "tetraptych" describes 4 parts; "pentaptych" describes 5 parts; "hexaptych" describes 6 parts; "heptaptych" describes 7 parts; and "octaptych" is the term used for an eight-part, or eight-panel, work of art. Polyptychs typically display one "central" or "main" panel that is usually the largest of the attachments, while the other panels are called "side" panels, or "wings." Sometimes, as evident in the Ghent and Isenheim works, the hinged panels can be varied in arrangement to show different "views" or "openings" in the piece.

See also: Ptykhe

Πυρφόρος ― Πυρφόρος (for which the Anglicized term is Pyrphoros) the fire bearer

See also: Pyrphoros

Σκοπός

Σωφροσύνη ― Σωφροσύνη (for which the Anglicized term is Sophrosyne) philosophical term etymologically meaning healthy-mindedness and from there self-control or moderation guided by knowledge and balance. Greeks upheld the ideal of sophrosyne, which means prudence and moderation but ultimately its complex meaning, so important to the ancients, is very difficult to convey in English. It is perhaps best expressed by the two most famous sayings of the oracle at Delphi: "Nothing in excess" and "Know thyself." The term suggests a life-long happiness obtained when one's philosophical needs are satisfied, resembling the idea of enlightenment through harmonious living. It is a nearly lost Classical ideal, but is enjoying some revival today with its emphasis on individuals to live within the proportions of reason and nature, this being achieved through practical wisdom and self knowledge. Parallels abound in eastern thought, in Sanatana Dharma, Buddhism and Taoism. (1) control of self, (2) temperance, restraint; (3) moderation

See also: Sophrosyne

Σπονδή ― Σπονδή (for which the Anglicized term is Sponde) drink offering; libation

See also: Sponde

Σπονδοφοροί ― Σπονδοφοροί (for which the Anglicized term is Spondophoroi) meaning libation bearers

See also: Spondophoroi

Στοιχεῖα ― Στοιχεῖα (for which the Anglicized term is Stoicheia) elements

See also: Stoicheia

Στρομβοειδής ― Of Spiral Nature

Στέργεως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Storgos) Στέργεωςmeaning Natural Everyday Love and Affection between joined partners, normally without the extreme highs and lows one might experience with Ἔρως.

See also: Storgos, and Love

Συγκρητισμός ― Συγκρητισμός (for which the Anglicized term is Sugkretismos) union or to unify, federation of Cretan communities, particularily referring to the period toward the end of the High Civilization of Crete, where the different communities put aside their internal differences to attempt to fend off the new invaders, Sea People.

See also: Sugkretismos

Συναγαπάως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Sunaegaepaeos) Συναγαπάωςmeaning (Polyamorous Love, Love among more than two Lovers within the same context)

See also: Sunaegaepaeos, and Love

Συνείδησις ― Συνείδησις (for which the Anglicized term is Suneidesis) self-consciousness: conscience,

See also: Suneidesis

Συνεπαίσθησις ― Συνεπαίσθησις (for which the Anglicized term is Sunepaesthesis) consciousness, apperception,

See also: Sunepaesthesis

Συνέλευσις ― Συνέλευσις (for which the Anglicized term is Suneliusis) a coming together, meeting, co-operation

See also: Suneliusis

Συνίημι ― Συνίημι (for which the Anglicized term is Sunieme) quick comprehension, mother-wit, intelligence, snap, sagacity,

See also: Sunieme

Σύγγνωσις ― Σύγγνωσις (for which the Anglicized term is SygGnosos) Consciousness

See also: SygGnosos

Σύμβολον ― Σύμβολον (for which the Anglicized term is Symbolon) a sign or token by which one infers a thing

See also: Symbolon

Σύμπόσιον ― Σύμπόσιον (for which the Anglicized term is Symposion) a dinner or drinking party focused on the discussion of philosophy

See also: Symposion

Συγκρητισμός ― Συγκρητισμός (for which the Anglicized term is Synkretismos) meaning in part, a 'union of communities', referencing the ideas of the "Cretan federation", and thus by implication the process of two or more ordinarily opposed groups uniting into a common front against a common foe. The connection of this concept to the Cretan culture is based on the stories of their reconciling their differences and coming together in alliance when faced with extreme external dangers. Rather than directly referring to Crete, it could be connected with Κρητισμός (for which the Anglicized term is Kretismos) which indicates the idea of 'lying' in general, and further from Κρητίζω (for which the Anglicized term is Kretizo) meaning 'to play the Cretan', or simply 'to lie like a Cretan'; due to the reputation that developed in the later Ægean cultures about the behaviours of the Cretan peoples, perhaps during the period where the Cretans held complete Ἡγεμονία (for which the Anglicized term is Hegemonia) meaning hegemony over the region which ended somewhere in the 1500bce to 1200bce era. The Greek language contains a selection of specific words which translate as "lie like a Cretan", with the inference that lying was one of their primary cultural markers, indeed mendacity, was the general reputation of Cretans in reports from antiquity. A third, fourth, and fifth possible source for the second part of the word could be connected to Κεράννυμι (for which the Anglicized term is Kerannumi) meaning 'to mix' or 'to prepare by mixing'; or Κέρασμα (for which the Anglicized term is Kerasma) meaning 'mixture'; or Κρᾶσις (for which the Anglicized term is Krasis) meaning 'mixture' as well on the analogy of accretion or concrete; such as is seen in the Ancient Greek word Ἰδιοσυγκρασία (for which the Anglicized term is idiosynkrasía) meaning 'a peculiar temperament' or perhaps a 'mixed type of temperament'?

The High Cretan civilization had fallen long before the various Ægean strains combined to form what modern civilization refers to as Classical Greek culture, and only had a small overlap with the Mycenaean culture which may have served as a bridge between the two. So it is difficult to know what the general moral fiber of the Cretans during their heyday might have been, since the freshest memories at that time in the cultures we depend on for reporting on these issues would have developed from their dealings with the Cretans when they were under extreme duress, and desperation at the collapse of their civilization, whatever combination of natural disaster and armed invasions may have ultimately been responsible. The Greek thinkers and writers that we are more familiar with had quite mixed opinions of the Cretan culture. On the one hand they were somewhat in awe of them and used the term Ἐτεόκρητες (for which the Anglicized term is Eteokretes) meaning 'true Cretans, of the old stock', and there were legends, including some admiration, of how the separate Cretan communities had banded together when under attack and at least partially successfully fought off the ever enigmatic 'Sea People' at the beginnings of the end of their high civilization. And on the other hand there were still a lot of cultural resentments from the period when the Cretans had been in a sort of position of unassailable control over the region and doubtless had given the mainlanders cause for some alarm and resentment.

The strong connection of the term Syncretism, with the root words indicating 'lying' or 'to lie', should perhaps be a warning to us to regard any Syncretic efforts with a fair amount of caution, and indeed many ideas put forth as Syncretic do ring quite hollow.

See also: Syncretism

Σύνεσις ― Σύνεσις (for which the Anglicized term is Synesis) (1) unification; (2) understanding, a coming together,

See also: Synesis

Σύνθημα ― Σύνθημα (for which the Anglicized term is Synthema) password, agreed on signs and countersigns

See also: Synthema

ΣύνΑἴσθησια ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Synesthesia) (also spelled synæsthesia or synaesthesia, plural synesthesiae or synaesthesiae) is a word stemming from the Ancient Greek Σύν (syn), meaning 'together', and Αἴσθησις (aisthesis), meaning 'sensation' is sometimes a neurologically-based condition in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway. In other cases it may be a psychic talent or gift, and of course one may predisposition a person for the other. People who report such experiences are sometimes called Synesthetes.

See also: Synesthesia

Τέχνη ― Τέχνη (for which the Anglicized term is Techne) and is often translated as craftsmanship, craft, or art. It is the rational method involved in producing an object or accomplishing a goal or objective. The means of this method is through art. Techne resembles episteme in the implication of knowledge of principles, although techne differs in that its intent is making or doing, as opposed to "disinterested understanding. See more at the Wikipedia article.

See also: Techne

Τελειν ― Τελειν (for which the Anglicized term is Telein) to make perfectly complete; to initiate, to perform a rite

See also: Telein

Τέλεος ― Τέλεος (for which the Anglicized term is Teleos) Teleos is the overall design or purpose directing nature toward her fulfillment. Teleos is the pattern hidden within each human being that guides the individualizing process. Teleos is the archetypal paradigm that resonates within us as human beings, prompting us to aspire to realize our full potential. 1. which is complete – which contains all the requisite parts; 2. which is so good that nothing of the kind could be better; 3. which has attained its purpose.

See also: Teleos

Τελεσφορία ― Τελεσφορία (for which the Anglicized term is Telesforia) performance of components of Sacred rites to bring initiation into the mysteries,

See also: Telesforia

Τέλεσμα ― Τέλεσμα (Telesma) is an Ægean term which indicates: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature. Τέλεσμα may be considered to be sort of an umbrella category for: All Sacred Objects, Sacramental Objects, Ritual Tools, Ceremonial Tools, Mægikal Implements, Foci, Amulets, Talismen, Φυλάσσειν, Charms, Fetishes, Mascots, Fascinum, Gri-Gri, Juju, Bulla, and so forth. Including as a subset, objects thought to provide lodging or perhaps anchoring for Elementals, and other non-corporeal entities, though these were normally considered to have some sort of independant existence and possible motivations beyond those which they might or might not be charged with on behalf of the wearer or possessor of such devices. When the term Τέλεσμα is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool and/or Focus it may refer to any and/or any combination of these type objects.

The most renowned of these objects, in whichever classification they might obtain and/or move between, are those which were found in situ, in Nature, formed by Her careful Hands into some special and widely recognizable symbol (or of a shape and ambience, which might evolve into such symbol); or those which having fallen from the sky (like certain symbols of the celebrated Cybele, and the symbol carried on the Standard of a certain Nome of "PreDynastic" Ægypt), which in some cases, in addition to their already exhalted status from having been observed coming from the sky, were also felt to be shaped in a manner which was widely felt to be (or on it's way to becoming) specifically symbolic.

Some feel that simple accurate delineation of the meaning of terms is excessively assiduous, however, if one is going to discuss complex philosophical and metaphysical issues, precisely defined terms may be as important to being successful at that, as finely sharpened scalpels and other surgeon's instruments are to successful medical procedures.

All of these items may be perceived as aiding in preserving a person and/or his or her relatives, friends, and/or possessions from one or more particular types of harm, and/or bringing to them some benefit. And in some senses to treat maladies and/or act as prophylactic agents against such maladies.

Though this is an oversimplification, the different objects may be sorted in this manner: Sacred Objects are items which are considered to have innate characteristics which make them Sacred, to a particular Tradition, and/or in general; Sacramental Objects are those which are utilized in processing the Sacraments in a given Tradition, whether the items themselves are considered to be embued with Sacred qualities in and of themselves, or to build up such qualities over a period of use; Ritual Tools, are those implements (in many Traditions, considered to be at least the Chalice, a Blade, a Wand, and some sort of Paten, but also often the Lantern, the Bell, the Besom, and others), that may be used, primarily in group settings, in both Natural Magick and Ceremonial Magick Werkings; Ceremonial Tools are those implements which are more specific to Ceremonial Werkings; Mægikal Implements are those which are specific to, and often specifically made for, particular Werkings including Solitary Werkings, (for instance: the Iynx would normally fall in this group); Foci are those items which are used to focus Divination processes, such as Crystal gazing, Tarot readings, Astrological interpretations, and so forth; Amulets are normally small objects, engraved or not, that are worn by a particular person, sometimes on a specific part of the body, usually touching the skin, which is thought to continually exert some influence on behalf of the wearer; Talismans (I find Talismen a much more amuzing pluralization, however, it is wickedly improper English, . . . though whether that is a 'good thing' or a 'bad thing' is certainly up for debate) are thought to be designed for some one specific purpose and may be worn, carried, and/or left in different locales to perform such purpose, with or without the benefit of some wearer; Φυλάσσειν are that which we keep, specifically souvenir treasures that people do tend to keep, the beliefs about their efficacy and potence vary widely; Charms may be considered to be sort of minor Amulets tending toward simple decorative use; Fetishes are like Amulets but are considered to be homes for, or anchors in physical reality for some sort of independent non-corporeal entities, often what are referred to as Elementals, which are considered to be constrained to perform certain functions, but may in addition, act on their own agendas; Mascots (though the term in now mostly used in reference to Mascots of athletic teams and such) are a sub grouping of usually small Τέλεσμα (though obviously they may be any size) which are specifically for the purpose of bringer their possessors luck; Fascina are specific, normally phallic shaped items which were designed to avert the "Evil Eye" or Baleful Countenance; the term Gri-Gri is usually in reference to a small bag, worn on the body of a person which contains a mixture of any of the following: herbs, oils, stones, bones, slips of paper of which may have writings on them, hair, nails, grave dirt, feathers, and other small items; the term Juju, like Mâna, and numerous other terms actually refers more to the mægikal field, or power of various types of objects, or the energy with which they effect their actions, rather than the items themselves; Bullae are a specific type of object that is has a rounded or dome shaped side, primarily connected with Roman culture, where they were worn continually by Roman boys from a few days after birth until they became adults.

See also: Sacred Objects, Sacramental Objects, Ritual Tools, Ceremonial Tools, Mægikal Implements, Foci, Amulets, Talismen, Φυλάσσειν, Charms, Fetishes, Mascots, Fascina, Gri-Gri, Juju, Mâna, Bullae,

In many cases these objects pertain only to a specific Tradition or a small grouping of Traditions, however some of the more Celebrated have moved out into a more planet-wide consensus reality paradigm.

Τελετή ― Τελετή (for which the Anglicized term is Telete) (1) performance; (2) Sacred rite; (3) initiation in the mysteries, a festival accompanied by such rites, mystic rites at initiation, to take in hand the matter of initiation

See also: Telete

Τέλος ― Τέλος (for which the Anglicized term is Telos) meaning specifically 'Ends', 'Purposes', and/or 'Goals', and by extension relates to the ideas of purposefulness, and that persons, places, and things possess aims, purposes, and/or intentions. Τέλος implies an end or ends of overarching importance to which all things and events may be related. Τέλος (Teleos) may be contrasted to Τέχνη (for which the Anglicized term is Techne), though they are by no means mutually exclusive. Modern Linguistics contains much discussion of whether it is possible/relevant/beneficial to use terminology when discussing ideas which do not include Teleological implications. Τέλεος (Teleos) may also be compared to Τέλος (Telos), which is a similiar but distinct concept.

See also: Telos

Τέμενος ― Τέμενος (for which the Anglicized term is Temenos) [plural Τεμένη (Temene)] is derived originally from the Greek verb form Τέμνω (for which the Anglicized term is Temno) meaning 'To Cut'. The concept of Τέμενος arose in the Ægean cultures as a term indicating spaces set aside for Sacred praxis, often for Celebration of the Rites associated with various Deity forms. These Sacred Spaces range from special areas in the Natural World to buildings and Temple structures.

See also: Temenos

Θάνατος ― Θάνατος (for which the Anglicized term is Thanatos) (1) death; (2) fatal

See also: Thanatos

Θέλημα ― Θέλημα (for which the Anglicized term is Thelema) the desire to do something, will

See also: Thelema

Θελητής ― Θελητής (for which the Anglicized term is Theletes) one who wills, a wizard, magician

See also: Theletes

Θεόγονος ― (Θεόγονος (for which the Anglicized term is Theogonos) meaning born of the Gods, Divine

See also: Theogonos

Θεοί ― Θεοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi) and is an Ægean designation for a vast range of Deities

See also: Theoi

Θεοί Ἀγοραῖοί ― Θεοί Ἀγοραῖοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Agoraioi ) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of the Agora (of the marketplace and place of people's assembly) Zeus, as the God of kings and princes, presided over the the assembly, alongside Athena, as Goddess of wise counsel, Dike (Justice), Themis (Custom) and Calliope (Eloquence). The Gods of the marketplace, on the other hand, were led by Hermes, the God of commerce, along with Hephaestus and Athena, the patron Gods of artisans : weavers, potters, metalworkers, sculptors, etc. Apollo was another God of the marketplace.

See also: Theoi Agoraioi

Θεοί Δαίτηοί ― Θεοί Δαίτηοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Daitioi ) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Feasts and Banquets. Dionysus, the God of wine, and Hestia, Goddess of feasting, presided over these. They were accompanied by festive Gods such as Aphrodite, Goddess of pleasure, and the Charites, Goddesses of joy, dancing and other amusements. The Theoi Mousikoi, or Gods of music, also accompanied the feast.

See also: Theoi Daitioi

Θεοί Γάμελιοί ― Θεοί Γάμελιοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Gamelioi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Marriage. The first of these were Zeus, Hera, and Aphrodite, but others included Hymenaios (Wedding Song), the Erotes (Loves), Peitho (Persuasion), the Charites (Graces), Eunomia (Good Order), Harmonia (Harmony) and Hebe (Youth).

See also: Theoi Gamelioi

Θεοί Γεώργικόί ― Θεοί Γεώργικόί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Georgikoi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Agriculture. Olympian Demeter was their leader, but for the most part these were non-Olympian chthonic Gods. See the Gods of Agriculture page for more information.

See also: Theoi Georgikoi

Θεοί Γυμναστικόί ― Θεοί Γυμναστικόί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Gymnastikoi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of the Gymnasium (in all of its eductional purview), Athletics and the Games. The first of these were Hermes, Heracles and the Dioscuri. Nike (Victory) and Agon (Contest) were minor daemones of the Games. Eros, as the God of comradeship, was also frequently worshipped in the gymnasia.

See also: Theoi Gymnastikoi

Θεοί Ἁλιοί ― Θεοί Ἁλιοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Halioi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of the Sea. The Theoi Halioi are led by Olympian Poseidon. Several of the other Olympian Gods had minor maritime roles including Apollo, Artemis, Aphrodite and the Dioscuri who presided over embarkations, harbours, safe voyage, and salvation from storms. Most of this class of Deity, however, were non-Olympian marine divinities.

See also: Theoi Halioi

Θεοί Ἰατρικοί ― Θεοί Ἰατρικοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Iatrokoi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Health, Medicine, and Healing. These belonged to the train of Apollo and included his son the medicine-god Asclepius, and his family : Epione (Soothing), Hygeia (Good Health), Panaceia (Curative), Aegle (Radiance), Iaso (Healing), Aceso (Cure) and Telesphorus (Accomplisher).

See also: Theoi Iatrokoi

Θεοί Χθόνιοί ― Θεοί Χθόνιοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Khthonioi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Earth and the regions under the surface of the Earth.

See also: Theoi Khthonioi

Θεοί Κτήσιοί ― Θεοί Κτήσιοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Ktesioi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Hearth, House, and Home. They were led by Hestia, the Goddess of the hearth, along with Zeus in his role as protector of the home (Ktesius) and of the family courtyard (Hikesius). Hecate and Hermes were also important household Gods who protected the gates and entranceways.

See also: Theoi Ktesioi

Θεοί Μάντεκοί ― Θεοί Μάντεκοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Mantikoi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Oracles, Divination, and Prophecy. Many of the Oracles and Pythonesses originally delivered communictions from Gaea, later the majority of them were taken over by the Traditions associated with Apollo, who became then, the God of oracles and seers, and Zeus, the God of fate. Other oracular Gods included the Titanesses Phoeibe (at Delphi) Themis (at Delphi and Dodona), Dione (at Dodona) and Mnemosyne (at Lebadeia). The God Hermes presided over certain primitive forms of diviniation including the casting of stones, coin-throwing oracles, and astrology. Lastly Pan and the Nymphs inspired the rustic prophets.

See also: Theoi Mantikoi

Θεοί Mousikoi ― Θεοί Μουσικοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Mousikoi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Music, Dance and Education and Training in the Arts. They are led by Mnemosyne, her sisters the Elder Mousai [Melete (Practice), Aiode (Song), and Mneme (Memory, possibly the same as Mnemosyne, or perhaps their purviews were different vectors of Memory)], and her daughters the nine Younger Mousai (normally named as: Kleio, Euterpe, Thaleia, Melpomene, Terpsikhore, Erato, Polyhymnia, Ourania, and Kalliope.). Later the Olympian twins Apollo and Artemis, joined this grouping, the former presiding over music and poetry, and the latter over the choirs and dances. Other important musical Gods included the the dancing Charites or Graces, and the musical demi-gods Hymenaeus and Linos. Dionysus, Hermes and Aphrodite were also Gods of music and the arts.

See also: Theoi Mousikoi

Θεοί Νομίοί ― Θεοί Νομίοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Nomioi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of the Countryside, Pastures, and Wild Forests. Chief among the Theoi Nomioi are the Olympians: Artemis (Lady of the Beasts and Hunting), Hermes (for Lord of the Herds) and Dionysus (Master of Wild Vegetation and the Vine). The rest of the rustic Gods were mostly non-Olympian divinities. Gaea, The primeval Goddess of the earth. Her body was the earth itself. Gaea's realm was shared by Demeter (the fertile plains) and Rhea (the mountain wilds). The great mother of the Gods, Rhea, queen of the mountain wilds. She drove a chariot drawn by lions accompanied by a band of spear-clashing Korybantes. The Phrygian Kybele and Attis. The Arcadian God of shepherds and flocks, great Pan. Men travelling through the lonely places of the wilds were struck with irrational panic by the God. Pan was depicted as a goat-legged, horned God. Hephaistos (the God of Smything, Metalworking, and Wrighting) occasionally consorted with the the Theoi Nomioi, a friend of the Dionysos. The Theoi Nomioi also includes the Nymphai; the Epimelides; the Hekaterides; the Okeanides; the Potamoi; the Satyroi; the Seilenoi; the Panes; the Phaunoi; the Dryades; the Hamadryades; the Nysiades; the Oreiades; the Epimelides; the Naiades; the Kentauroi; the Korybantes; the Kouretes; the Kabeiroi; the Bakkhantes, Mainades, or Bassarides; the Nesoi; the Ourea; the Daktyloi; the Pheres Lamian; the Palikoi; the Tityroi; the Meliai; the Kerkopes; as well as Ariadne, Britomartis, Methe, Zagreus, Kheiron, Aigipan, Aix, Ampelos, Anytos, Aristaios, Autonoe, Kadmilos, Kedalion, Khariklo, Komos, Konisalos, Korymbos, Ekho, Hekaerge, Hekateros, Loxo, Melisseos, Nysos, Orthannes, Oxylos, Phales, Phaunos, Priapos, Pyrrhikhos, Seilenos, Sokos, Telete, Thriai, Thyone, Thysa, Tykhon, and Oupis.

See also: Theoi Nomioi

Θεοί Ὀλυμπίοί ― Θεοί Ὀλυμπίοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Olympioi) and is an Ægean designation for the primary Olympian Deities, in most systems limited to twelve. Thus they were also referred to as the Δωδεκάθεον (Dodekatheon), however the twelve was a fluid ordering, and changed both over time and in different recordings of the system. There was a large retinue of other Deities associated closely with the Olympians and considered to have Mount Olympos as their centre of power.

See also: Theoi Olympioi

Θεοί Οὐράνιοί ― Θεοί Οὐράνιοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Ouranioi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of the Sky, Celestial Spheres, or Heavens

See also: Theoi Ouranioi

Θεοί Πολεμικοί ― Θεοί Πολεμικοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Polemikoi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of War. These were led by Ares and Athena, and included Gods such as Enyo, Eris (Strife), Nike (Victory), Deimos (Terror) and Phobos (Fear). Zeus, as the God of fate, and Apollo, as God of archery, also had wartime functions.

See also: Theoi Polemikoi

Θεοί Πολικοί ― Θεοί Πολικοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Polikoi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of the Polis (city).

See also: Theoi Polikoi

Θεοί Πρωτογενοι ― Θεοί Πρωτογενοι (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Protogenoi) (Prôtogenoi), meaning First-Born.

See also: Theoi Protogenoi and Theoi Titanes

Θεοί Θέσμιοί ― Θεοί Θέσμιοί (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Thesmioi) and is an Ægean designation for Deities who include within their primary purviews issues of Law and Custom. The Theoi Thesmioi were lead by Themis (Custom), Zeus in his form as Zeus Nomius (of the Laws) and Demeter Thesmophorus (the Law Bringer). This sphere included the Horae, specifically Dike (Justice), Eunomia (Good Order), and Irene (Peace), daughters of Themis, Athena, and Apollo.

See also: Theoi Thesmioi

Θεοί Τιτᾶνες ― Θεοί Τιτᾶνες (for which the Anglicized term is Theoi Titanes). Referring to the earliest Deities in the Ægean systems as "the Titans" (or variations thereof) is late terminology, these Deities were originally and more properly designated as Πρωτογενοι (Prôtogenoi), meaning First-Born.

See also: Theoi Titanes and Theoi Protogenoi

Θεολογέω ― Θεολογέω (for which the Anglicized term is Theologio) indicating study, discourse, and theorizing about the Divine Forces and Cosmology.

See also: Theologio

Θεωρία ― Θεωρία (for which the Anglicized term is Theoria) Contemplation

See also: Theoria

Θεωρός ― Θεωρός (for which the Anglicized term is Theoros) possibly derived from the earlier Θεᾱ-ϝορός (for which the Anglicized term is ) (plural Θεωροί (Theoroi) indicating Sacred envoys and/or consecrated Officiants in the ambassadorial sense.

See also: Theoros

Θησαυρός ― Θησαυρός (for which the Anglicized term is Thesauros) (plural Τρησαυροί (Tresauroi)] treasury, vault, repository, place of safe keeping for valuables, applicable across physical, mental, and spiritual realms.

See also: Thesauros

Θίασος ― Θίασος (for which the Anglicized term is Thiasos) [plural Θίασοί (Thiasoi)] refers to any religious group or association dedicated to a specific Deity or in some cases an entire Panthoen. Thiasos is a term used freqently in Temple names in modern Hellenismos, a grouping of numerous Traditions, mostly of a reconstructionist type, such as Thiasos Apollon, Thiasos Athena, or Thiasos Dionysos. In Classical through to Modern times, often noted were the ecstatic retinues of Dionysos, often pictured as inebriated (spiritually and physically) revelers.

See also: Thiasos

Θρενἔρως ― (the Anglicized form of the term is Threneros) Θρενἔρως meaning (Romantic and Sexual Love characterized by an inability to get along out of bed)

See also: Threneros, and Love

Θυμός ― Θυμός (for which the Anglicized term is Thymos) (1) spiritedness; (2) ambition; (3) will to power

See also: Thymos

Το Ηεν ― Το Ηεν (for which the Anglicized term is To Hen) is an NeoPlatonic concept meaning an incomprehensible original source, and Divine essence, as explicated by the Hellenistic thinker Plotinus.

See also: To Hen

Χαθαρος


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Capital A with ring aboveÅ   Capital A with macronĀ   Capital A with breveĂ   Capital A with diaeresisÄ   Capital A with circumflex   Capital A with dot aboveȦ   Capital A with inverted breveȂ   Capital A with tildeà   Capital A with ogonekĄ   Capital AE ligatureÆ   Capital AE ligature with tildeÆ̃   Capital Glottal Stop   Capital Palatoalveolar Click   Regular English AA   Script Capital L   Capital L with macron above   Capital L with dot below   Capital L with stroke, Dark L Ł   Regular English LL   Capital WHω   Capital W with macron above   Capital W with dot below   Regular English WW   Capital Slide H with reverse solidusℋ⃥   Capital H with macron above   Capital H with dot below   Aspirate   Slight Pause   Very Slight Pause   Regular English HH   Capital S with macron above   Capital S with dot above   Capital SH sign   Capital SKΣ   Regular English SS   Hard and Deep Capital DД   High and Light Capital D   Regular English DD   Capital O with ring above   Capital O with macronŌ   Capital O with breveŎ   Capital O with diaeresisÖ   Capital O with solidusØ   Capital OE ligatureŒ   Capital O with Cyrillic Round OmegaѺ   Capital OI   Capital O with ogonekǪ   Capital O with double oo top   Regular English OO   Capital EZJHʑ   Capital Z with macron below   Capital Z with dot aboveŻ   Regular English ZZ   Capital K with macron aboveК̅   Capital K with dot below К̣   Capital Hard KHχ   Capital KHƙ   Regular English KK   Capital V with macron above   Capital V with dot below   Regular English VV   Capital G with macron   Capital G with dot aboveĠ   Capital GNΓ   Capital GRЖ   Capital GWCapital GW   Capital Uvular Voiced ImplosiveϘ   Regular English GG   Capital rolled R with macronЯ̅   Capital rolled R with dot aboveЯ̇   Capital R with macron above   Capital R with dot above   Capital R with ogonek   Regular English RR   Capital C with cedillaÇ   Capital CHЧ   Regular English CC   Capital N with macron above   Capital N with dot below   Capital N with tildeÑ   Capital NGŋ   Capital NG with macron aboveŋ̅   Regular English NN   Capital Y with macron above Ȳ   Capital Y with dot above   Capital Y with yaw aboveЎ   Regular English YY   Capital J with macron aboveЈ̅   Capital J with dot belowЈ̣   Regular English JJ   Capital U with a ring aboveŮ   Capital U with macronŪ   Capital U with breveŬ   Capital U with circumflex aboveÛ   Capital U with diaeresisÜ   Regular English UU   Capital F with macron above   Capital F with dot above   Regular English FF   Capital Q with macron above   Capital Q with dot above   Regular English QQ   Capital B with macron   Capital B with dot below   Trilled BTrilled B   Regular English BB   Capital M with macron   Capital M with dot below   Capital M with tilde   Capital MBCapital MB   Capital MG   Regular English MM   Capital X with macron above   Capital X with dot above   Regular English XX   Capital I with macronĪ   Capital I with breveĬ   Regular English II   Capital T with macron above   Capital T with dot below   Capital TH voicedΘ   Capital TH voicelessÞ   Capital TSЦ   Capital TSCHЩ   Regular English TT   Capital E with macronĒ   Capital E with breveĔ   Capital E with circumflexÊ   Capital schwa Ə   Regular English EE   Capital P with macron above   Capital P with dot above   Capital pTCapital pT   Regular English PP

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