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Special Note: Garden of Life uses a large number of specially purposed English words, often spelled slightly differently than regular, to make their specific meaning more apparent. We also use a large number of neologisms, specifically constructed for Temple use. All of this type of terminology is defined in several places on the website, here in the Garden of Life website Definitions pages, in the Articles of Organization glossary, and such. If you are viewing this page in a browser which doesn't support full current Unicode coding or if you haven't installed current free Unicode fonts, such as Code2000 version 1.171 at FontSpace or Alphabetical List of Unicode Fonts, many of the phonetic characters, diacritical marks, and symbols in these pages will not show up or will show up as boxes. Availability changes so you may have to do a search. It's a free font for personal use, so we can send you a copy if you can't find it. And the display probably won't be perfect anyway, but it's getting closer all the time. At the risk of belabouring the extremely obvious, this page is a work in progress, with quite a distance to go before it sleeps. All of these Attributions are from our perspective. We are not putting them forward as objective fact. We welcome all feedback at Defs@gardenoflifetemple.com, though we do not guarantee to process such feedback other than for ascertainable accuracy and usefulness. Thanks.
 

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Ṇ't̄ā ― A specific Tradition's Holy Writings, Chants, Songs, Celebratory Rituals and other components of the Traditions Sacred Practice.

Ṇ't̄ā and Foci

Ṇ'm̃ŭя̇ç P̅ŭʀ̇ ― The Office of Sacramental Objects may elect from among its members one Individual to serve as the Garden of Life Ṇ'm̃ŭя̇ç P̅ŭʀ̇. This Officer shall have responsibility for the Garden of Life collection of loanable Ceremonial Vestments, and any items which may be used to enhance the comfort of attendees at Garden of Life events. N'ta Go to the Garden of Life N'ta and Foci Codex

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Ñêṗēōç ― Ñêṗēōç is a phonetically constructed word based on a Greek root word meaning infant or newborn through the toddler stage used within the context of the Temple to refer to Sentients between birth and full childhood.

Ñêṗēōç ― Garden of Life considers Werks acknowledging and/or commemorating Passages from one stage of a lifecycle to the next as Pagan Sacraments. The timing of such Celebrations are not determined solely by physical ages but by the Individuals actual attainment of that stage. Ñêṗēōç passage and/or the Birth Perfectioning - marks the physical birth, helps to stabilize the infant's physical senses. It is the entrance into a new stage of existence from the last. We must make the passage easier and direct it to that being's True Will, whatever that may be. The child is formally dedicated to their Ultimate Potential Perfection, whatever that might be. Should the parents wish it, this is the traditional time to give the child a Mægikal Name within the Circle. Spiritual Gifts are often Called for the infant, by attending Celebrants, for instance: the Gift of Dance, the Gift of Beauty, and so forth. Goddess/God Parents are named if so desired. The Ñêṗēōç Passage and/or Birth Perfectioning may be performed at any point after the birth, and is the most popular of these Rites. Many different forms of Birth Perfectionings and/or Nepeos Rites of Passage have been Celebrated within the Garden of Life Temple context, but three main systems have received most of the Work. One pattern, that was developed first could be called an Element Blessing form, a very similar form could be called the Chakra Blessing form, the third, based on predynastic Ægyptian roots, could be called the Child Lotus form. These will be detailed below, other forms will be explicated as the information jells in our gestalt consciousness.

Element Blessing Form
In this Form, a robe, in a single symbolically significant colour is made or acquired by the parents, usually approximately twice the height of the Child from neck to toes (symbolizing the child's need for nurturance), with or without wings, halos or other accoutrement. The parents ask somewhere between 4 and 7 people to perform the Element Blessings, depending on whether they are going to use the 4 element pattern (Earth, Fire, Air, Water), 5 element pattern (Earth, Fire, Air, Water, Spirit), 7 element pattern (Earth, Fire, Air, Water, Spirit, Æther, Stone or Metal), or other. When the Perfectioning is Celebrated in Circle, the Officiants are spaced appropriately around the Circle. The parents carry the Child around to each station and the Child is blessed by each Officiant in a manner appropriate to that station. After this is finished the parents take the Child to the main altar (however that has been determined), where the Child is held up and "Hail the Crowned and Conquering Child" is proclaimed, with "So Mote It Be"s and other affirmations responding.

Chakra Blessing Form
This form is the same as the Element Blessing Form except that a Chakra pattern is substituted and the patterning consists of an Officiant performing Blessings related to each of the 7 (or other system) Chakras.

Child Lotus Form
In the original pattern, the Child was taken to the Nile as soon as practical after birth, and passed through a semicircle of Priestesses, from as many Traditions as possible, finally to the GrandMother (or someone filling that role) who encased the Child in a Lotus robe, and passed the Child through a slit in a Golden Veil, held by Priestesses of the Two Lands, to the Mother who stood on the Land. After this all retired to the home of the parents for a feast and conviviality. We ordinarily use a swimming pool and pass the Child through a semicircle of the assembled Celebrants, with each Blessing the Child.

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Name ― When the term Name [in Aleister Crowley's 777 Tables of Correspondences, key number 8] is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool and/or Focus it generally refers to a grouping of sounds by which something may be referred to in a widely or narrowly understood manner, specifically created for general or particular Mægikal Werking, and/or consecrated to the same.

see also: Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci , Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Namertēsomancy and Namertēsoscopy ― When the term Namertēsomancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination using dolls, puppets, and/or marionettes.

The term Namertēsomancy is derived from the Greek words: Ναμερτής (Namertes) meaning doll or puppet, and Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Naos ― Naos as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Ναός may refer to a Temple in a general manner, but more often this term is used to indicate an interior portion of a Temple, or a constructed shrine, which may stay in a 'Holy of Holies' placement within a Temple or may be portable, so that the votive figures and accoutrements of a particular Tradition, may be carried around without actually being totally (or even partially in some cases) exposed to the eyes of the uninitiated. These figures may be representational statuary of particular Deities, and/or objects Sacred to the Tradition. The Ναός refers to the enclosure, (sometimes multiple nested enclosures) itself which contains the items. Some Traditions developed patterns of processional pathways to other Temples, to Sacred Rivers or High Places, and/or cirumambulations returning to the starting point. In some cases there was no particular destination, since the potency of the process was considered to lie in the act of carrying the figures through the territory so that the populace could see either them or the enclosure which itself had become Sacred to the Tradition.

See also: Ναός

Narcomancy and Narcoscopy ― When the term Narcomancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination from some sort of anesthesized state, approaching sleep.

The term Narcomancy is derived from the Greek words: Νάρκη (Nark) meaning numbness, anesthesized state; and Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Nascence ― When the term Nascence is used to designate one of the Garden of Life principal Celebrations, it refers to one of five Celebrations which constitute the Celebrations of the Rites and Festivals of ḠĀĒÄ, based on our interpretation of the Vegetative Cycle. One of the Great Celebrations on the Garden of Life Temple Calendar, Nascence Memorializes and Honours the First Fast Growth of the vegetative cycle when the Earth Begins to Give Forth the Product of Fertile Soil and Vigorous Seed and Blossoming as the Prelude to Pollination and the Promise of the Harvest. The Key Concept is the Sanctity of Reciprocation from the Plane of Matter. It is an Ideal time for Communions, Manifestations and Joinings for Persons, Places, Objects, Ideas and Plans. Parallel to many Tradition's F̅я̄ĭḡ'χä or Beltaine, the time and place of Garden of Life's Celebration of this Ḡāēäñ HolyDay will be determined by the Council of Elder Officiants as a Celebration of the Peak Efflorescence and First Growth of the Growing Season [Currently for the Northern Hemisphere of Ḡāēä (the procedures for the Southern Hemisphere of Ḡāēä will be determined at such time as there are Garden of Life members planning Celebrations in the Southern Hemisphere. However the seasons are pretty straightforwardly switched out.)]. Nascence will fall between the Vernal Equinox and the Summer Solstice.

See also: HolyDay, Garden of Life Temple Celebrations, Celebratory Rites and Festivals of ḠĀĒÄ, Lunar Celebratory Rites and Festivals, Solar Celebratory Rites and Festivals, Θê'ēäñäд'äs̄, Sacramental Celebrations, and Informal Spiritual Celebrations

Nationalism

Native American - Central ― [A somewhat artificial grouping, (but perhaps helpful as a convenience in grouping for survey purposes) These cultures did have things in common but were quite distinct in fact even within small geographical areas] It is possible to refer to a regional grouping of MetaPhysical Orientations as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, especially if strong traditions that are specific to the region are important to those groups. Central Native American refers in particular to those Traditions and/or whose strong identifying characteristics were developed in place in Central America regardless of whether later exported or not.

Native American - Northern ― [A somewhat artificial grouping, (but perhaps helpful as a convenience in grouping for survey purposes) These cultures did have things in common but were quite distinct in fact even within small geographical areas] It is possible to refer to a regional grouping of MetaPhysical Orientations as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, especially if strong traditions that are specific to the region are important to those groups. Northern Native American refers in particular to those Traditions and/or whose strong identifying characteristics were developed in place in North America regardless of whether later exported or not.

Native American - Southern ― [A somewhat artificial grouping, (but perhaps helpful as a convenience in grouping for survey purposes ) These cultures did have things in common but were quite distinct in fact even within small geographical areas] It is possible to refer to a regional grouping of MetaPhysical Orientations as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, especially if strong traditions that are specific to the region are important to those groups. Southern Native American refers in particular to those Traditions and/or whose strong identifying characteristics were developed in place in South America regardless of whether later exported or not.

Native American Spirituality ― The religious beliefs, practices, and rituals associated Native Americans. Early Native American beliefs, though diverse, often shared common religious ideas. Many believed in a "Great Spirit," that nature in all of its forms possesses spirits (animism or spiritism), and that all life is interconnected. Seasons and moons often were viewed as marking times of evocation for spirits and prosperity. Some New Age believers promote revival of Native American spirituality, seeing obvious parallels with their own views.

Natural Mægik ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation of Experiential Spiritual Methodology, is ordinarily characterized by much emphasis being placed on celebrating and emphasizing the cycles of Nature within Werkings. Most Traditions utilize a mix of Natural Mægik and Ceremonial Mægik as far as their Werkings go. Pagan Traditions have traditionally leaned more towards the Natural Mægik end of the spectrum to a greater or lessor degree depending upon the Tradition and the individual practitionors.

Naturism ― A MetaPhysical Orientation toward the Divine, that Nature is Divine.

Naturopathy ― Deepens the action of the natural healing forces present in the human body and works on the principle that the body can naturally heal itself. Concerned with discovering and removing the root cause of disease whether it be chemical, mechanical or psychological with nutrition and non-invasive techniques.

Necessary Truth ― In the distinctions made between categories and/or types of truth, Necessary truth is a feature of any statement that it would be contradictory to deny. (Contradictions themselves are necessarily false.) Contingent truths (or falsehoods) happen to be true (or false), but might have been otherwise. Thus, for example:
                  "Squares have four sides." is necessary.
                  "Stop signs are hexagonal." is contingent.
                  "Pentagons are round." is contradictory.
This distinction was traditionally associated (before Kant and Kripke) with the distinctions between a priori and a posteriori knowledge and the distinction between analytic and synthetic judgment. Necessity may also be defined de dicto in terms of the formal logical property of tautology. necessary/contingent types of truth

Necessity of Securing the Lineage

Necklace ― When the term Necklace is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool, Ritual Apparatus, and/or Focus it generally refers to a piece of ornamental jewelry created to be worn around the neck specifically made for general or particular Mægikal Werking, and/or consecrated to the same.

see also: Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci , Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Necromancy and Necroscopy ― When the term Necromancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination utilizing the dead, in their physical components, corpses, skeletons, skulls, and/or clothing and other items with which they may have been interred. In old and uninformed works Necromancy was often used to refer to any type of Mægik.

There has always been a fair amount of confusion between the terms Necromancy (and variants) and Necyomancy (and Nekyiamancy and other variants); and there are two main vectors which may be represented by them, one of which deals with the utilization of actual dead bodies, skeletons, and/or clothing and other items taken from the corpses, and the other having to do with communication with the non-corporeal parts of the dead, their spirits, and such. It may be useful in this division to point out that the Necromancy group of terms seems more appropriate to the first vector, i.e.: dealing with the actual dead remains and artifacts; and the Necyomancy type terminology seems to fit better with the rites to establish communication with their spirits. Needless to say (they said needfully), neither is really appropriate to communication with other types of non-corporeal entities, outside of those immediately associated with those who have incarnated as humans and still retain some of the characteristics from this adventure; but there is adequate terminology for all of those types of divinations anyway.

From the Middle English Nigromancie, from the Old French Nigremancie, from the Greek Nekromanteia. The term Necromancy is derived from the Greek words: Νεκρός (Nekros) meaning corpse, the dead, and of the dead, and Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Necyomancy and Necyoscopy ― When the term Necyomancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination involving rites whereby ghosts were called up and questioned,

There has always been a fair amount of confusion between the terms Necromancy (and variants) and Necyomancy (and Nekyiamancy and other variants); and there are two main vectors which may be represented by them, one of which deals with the utilization of actual dead bodies, skeletons, and/or clothing and other items taken from the corpses, and the other having to do with communication with the non-corporeal parts of the dead, their spirits, and such. It may be useful in this division to point out that the Necromancy group of terms seems more appropriate to the first vector, i.e.: dealing with the actual dead remains and artifacts; and the Necyomancy type terminology seems to fit better with the rites to establish communication with their spirits. Needless to say (they said needfully), neither is really appropriate to communication with other types of non-corporeal entities, outside of those immediately associated with those who have incarnated as humans and still retain some of the characteristics from this adventure; but there is adequate terminology for all of those types of divinations anyway. For instance: Necyomancy has been misapplied to types of divination which involve, to whatever degree of accuracy, summoning satan, one assumes the Abramic one.

The term Necyomancy is derived from the Greek words: Νέκυια (Nekuia) meaning rites whereby ghosts were called up and questioned ,and Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Need Fire ― When the term Need Fire is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool, Ritual Apparatus, and/or Focus it generally refers to Fire generated or conveyed to a particular Sacred Space, specifically made in an ancient and/or non-standard manner for general or particular Mægikal Werking, and/or consecrated to the same. It is often stipulated as created by friction alone, but each Tradition that utilized the concept, of course defines it for themselves, as is standard operating procedure in the entire Pagan community. In many cases the particular fire drill or whatever tools specified were kept in a special place, and passed down generation to generation, with precise rites to be followed when one or another component had to be replaced. In the very oldest known Traditions, the Need Fire might have to be lit from a fire started by lightning in the forest, or fire started by lava flow past tinder of some sort; these fires would often be tended and kept going for hundreds of years (if not more), publicly in a Temple like context, or hidden from the eyes of all except the specific ones chosen to guard it, or perform some other function relating to the fire.

Need Fire also has extensive roots, at least in Europe and especially in the North such as Scotland, in Folk practice, where it often was believed to be a final wall of defense against spreading illness among humans and/or cattle. In Folk praxis it often had stringent requirements as to how lit, and by whom, and who could or must observe the process, how many, phase of the Moon, time of day, and so forth. Each community developing its own traditions, often involving being lit by two sexually innocent boys, or by the most proficient stud in the valley, sometimes women as well, varying from prepubescent girls to the most ancient and wise crone available. Sometimes no one was permitted to watch till the process was going, other times the entire town must turn out and observe. In many instances all the fires in the area had to be extinguished before starting, and even individual's smoking during the process was strictly prohibited. Some traditions included the idea of two bonfires being built for the cattle to be driven through and/or the people to walk between. Often these fires might be in a special place such as as a major crossroads or on the highest possible accessible point in the area.

see also: Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci , Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Need Fire Kit ― When the term Need Fire Kit is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool, Ritual Apparatus, and/or Focus it generally refers to a set of the various apparati with which a fire may be started without metal, matches, or lighters; specifically made for general or particular Mægikal Werking, and/or consecrated to the same. Though various Traditions may specify what is acceptable to them to be part of the Need Fire Kit, generally it is thought to be desirable to have the tools to use more than one method.

Fire-Churning is still customary in India for the kindling the Sacred Fires the need- or wild-fire is made by the friction of one piece of wood on another, or of a rope upon a stake. The Hand Drill, Bow and Drill, Fire Plough, Fire-Thong, Fire Saw, and Fire Piston methods are widely accepted. A Burning Glass to concentrate the Sun's rays onto tinder, is widely acceptable, particularly for Solar Rites, and those things that might correspond to the Sun. Flint and Pyrites manage within the no metal prohibition. In some Traditions the Need-Fire was required to be started from a spark struck out of a cold anvil by a smith, in which case the no-metal parameter does not apply. Flint and Steel is a popular version in Traditions which do not prohibit Metal in the process. The modern Ferrocerium Rod is considered acceptable by some Traditions.

see also: Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci , Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

NEGATIVE CONFESSION (when considered as a Sacrament) ― When in reference to a Technique utilized in Garden of Life and probably other Traditions, Negative Confession is a type of Officiant Sanctification derived in form primarily from Ægyptian sources. When discussed as a Sacrament in Temple context, an Act, Acts, a Process, Processes and/or Series of Acts and/or Processes performed among Officiants, prior to a Werking to Cleanse their Total Fields of Being and Becoming (Physical, Mental, Spiritual and any other components) from anything which might detract from their peak functioning within the Werking, at their chosen type of Officiation. There is the further function of Consecrating their Total Fields of Being and Becoming (Physical, Mental, Spiritual and any other components) to this Werkings Success, to which they have pledged themselves. In our Tradition this is usually done by one Officiant kneeling in front of another Officiant, placing Her/His hands on the Heart Chakra of the other Officiant, reaching a calm centered state and either silently or aloud enumerating Her/His Actions that are causing concern (which has led them to request assistance in initiating this sacrament) perhaps incorporating the Ægyptian model of I Have Not Done . . ., until the Officiant feels that the Process is finished.
Below please find the wording that Garden of Life uses in it's Articles of Organization to delineate this Sacrament:
An Act, Acts, a Process, Processes and/or Series of Acts and/or Processes performed among Officiants, prior to a Werking to Cleanse their Total Fields of Being and Becoming (Physical, Mental, Spiritual and any other components) from anything which might detract from their peak functioning within the Werking, at their chosen type of Officiation. There is the further function of Consecrating their Total Fields of Being and Becoming (Physical, Mental, Spiritual and any other components) to this Werking's Success, to which they have pledged themselves. In our Tradition this is usually done by one Officiant kneeling in front of another Officiant, placing Her/His hands on the Heart Chakra of the other Officiant, reaching a calm centered state and either silently or aloud enumerating Her/His Actions that are causing concern (which has led them to request assistance in initiating this sacrament) perhaps incorporating the Ægyptian model of "I Have Not Done . . ." until the Officiant feels that the Process is finished.

NEGATIVE CONFESSIONS (when considered as a Sacrament) ― The above type Sacrament, referred to in the plural.

Negative Confessions (when considered as part of the original Ægyptian Religious Writings) ― In almost all the currently known recensions of the Book of Shadowing Forth by Day, (inaccurately referred to commonly as the Egyptian Book of the Dead), often listed as chapter 125 or CXXV, is a list of "I Have Not . . . ) statements, of varying number, but often one each for each of the existing Nomes (usually 42 or 44, occasionally less or more), with each one addressed to the primary Deity of each Nome, named metaphorically, e.g.: Wide Wing for Mut and so forth). These were listed and interred with the usually mummified body of persons, in order to assist them in attaining a favorable outcome in the Hall of the Weighing of Hearts in the afterlife.

Negative Confessions (in reference to the Garden of Life Rose Recension of Negative Confessions) ― see: Rose Recension of Negative Confessions

Nemesis ― Nemesis as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Νέμεσις (1) to give what is due; (2) divine vengeance or retribution

See also: Νέμεσις

Neokoros ― Neokoros as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Νεωκόρος (pl. neokoroi) (1) temple sweeper or caretaker; (2) a temple servant

See also: Νεωκόρος

Neologisms ― Neologisms are are generally comprised of newly and independently crafted words or phrases. Neologisms may also indicate the results of the process of giving new meanings, usages, to existing words or phrases. The term Neologism is applied to the introduction or use of new words or new senses of existing words, and especially comes into play when describing a new Philosophical and/or Spiritual doctrine, particularly in reference to a new interpretation of existing sacred writings. In order to know if one is creating Neologisms in English, one must have some way of telling what words, morphemes, and phrases are already officially in the English language; and what the precise rules are for utilization of root words that are already in English, such as how much latitude in modifying root words and morphemes, in a manner similar to which other comparable root words and morphemes have already been modified 'officially', is allowed before getting to the border of Neologism. The motivation for creating Neologisms of course varies, but often seems to be to simplify and/or increase the potential accuracy of discussion about areas of Human concerns and activities, which the language in which the Neologism is being offered, does not have an existing word for the exact delineation desired. Modern Linguistic theories do explore the ideas that the arsenal of words available to a given group does condition what can be talked about in an intelligble manner, and thus what is talked about by most members of the group.
See also: Neologisms, Garden of Life WordPlay Index, and Word Play in Definitions

NeoPagan ― (Latin, neo: "new "): A term often applied to both revivalist and reconstructionist Pagan religions in order to identify their modern adoption, or foundation, by their practitioners.

NeoPaganism ― NeoPaganism or "Neo-Paganism" which covers the Community of diverse contemporary religions which began in the attempts of Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Individuals to reconnect with nature, using imagery and forms from documentable and/or visionary knowledge of one or more of the Traditions of Antiquity, but with adjustments for the needs of modern people. Firmly rooted in indigenous traditions or deriving inspiration therefrom, NeoPagans are characterized by belief in the interconnection of all life, personal autonomy, and the immanence of the Sacred. Often these spiritual Traditions are nature-centered and supportive of gender equity. For clarity they may be thought of in three main branches. It is convenient to characterize these branches by their methodology, ReConstructionist, ReConstitutionist and Syncretist. The distinctions are, that ReConstructionists strive to ReCreate the Tradition of a particular IndigenoPagan group (or several closely related groups) as it was practiced in that time; the ReConstitutionists try to ReCreate the Tradition of a particular IndigenoPagan group (or several closely related groups) as it would be practiced in today's world, if it had been practiced continually since it's origination; the Syncretists create Traditions which are rooted in a combination of Pagan Traditions, which are not necessarily related in any direct manner.

NeoPhile ― An Individual who is predisposed to like new ideas, concepts and/or behaviors.

NeoPhilism ― When used in reference to a point of view within the field of Ethical, Value and/or Behavioural Matters, this is a Point of View in which the prime parameter for effectuating a course of action is determined by choosing that which is

NeoPhobe ― An Individual who is predisposed to dislike new ideas, concepts and/or behaviors.

NeoPhobism ― When used in reference to a point of view within the field of Ethical, Value and/or Behavioural Matters, this is a Point of View in which the prime parameter for effectuating a course of action is determined by choosing that which is

NeoPlatonism ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation toward the Divine, that postulates that the Divine exists on an Ideal Plane beyond temporal Reality.

Nephoseidomancy and Nephoseidoscopy ― When the term Nephoseidomancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination using shapes of clouds, related to cloud herding, rain making.

The term Nephoseidomancy is derived from the Greek words: Νέφος (Nefos) meaning cloud, mass of clouds; Εἶδος (Eidos) meaning that which is seen, form, shape; and Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Neptune (Local Star System Component) ― see: P̅ōs̄īдœñ

Netjerǫomancy and Netjerǫoscopy ― When the term Netjerǫomancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination using oracles, or oracular gifts particularly in the reception of messages from Deities, and Divine Forces. Also sometimes represented by Neterutepramancy.

The term Netjerǫomancy is derived from the words: the ǫgyptian word (Netjerǫ) meaning company of Deities, or a related grouping of Those whose Natures partake of Divinity, and the Greek Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Nētromancy and Nētroscopy ― When the term Nētromancy is used in reference to a type of Divination, it generally refers to divination utilizing spindles, alone or in combination with distaffs. In a number of Traditions the Spindle and Distaff, took on aspects of Staffs of Power, Sceptors, or other Ritual Tools and/or Mæggikal Implements.

The term Nētromancy is derived from the Greek words: Νῆτρον (Nētron) meaning spindle, and Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Network ― When the term Network is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool and/or Focus it generally refers to

Neuro Linguistic Programming ― (NLP) The science of learning to communicate with the unconscious mind through word and idea structures to uncover unconscious thoughts and behaviors to bring them into consciousness. Effective in promoting health and healing of the physical body where these unconscious attributes have become manifest. (NLP) New Age. Techniques developed by Richard Bandler and Dr. John Grinder that allegedly enable practitioners to read random eye movements and other visual cues during conversation or counseling to "program" a client's behavior and restructure their core beliefs. Called "software for the brain," it is supposed to be faster and more powerful than traditional clinical counseling and can work without the subject's conscious knowledge. The co-founders have been heavily involved with other New Age practices. Neuro Linguistic Programming is an approach to communication, personal development, and psychotherapy created in the 1970s. The title refers to a stated connection between the neurological processes ("neuro"), language ("linguistic"), and behavioral patterns that have been learned through experience ("programming") and can be organized to achieve specific goals in life. According to certain neuroscientists, psychologists, and linguists, NLP is unsupported by current scientific evidence, and uses incorrect and misleading terms and concepts. The founders of NLP, Richard Bandler and John Grinder, say that NLP is capable of addressing problems such as phobias, depression, habit disorder, psychosomatic illnesses, and learning disorders. The Ethical factors do not come into play in situations of self-programming or programming requested by the person involved; and only become problematic when the programming (however effective or ineffective it might be) is attempted on a person without consent. (see complete Wikipedia entry on Neuro Linguistic Programming)

NeuroLinguistics ― Neurolinguistics is the study of the neural mechanisms in the human brain that control the comprehension, production, and acquisition of language. As an interdisciplinary field, neurolinguistics draws methodology and theory from fields such as neuroscience, linguistics, cognitive science, neurobiology, communication disorders, neuropsychology, and computer science. Researchers are drawn to the field from a variety of backgrounds, bringing along a variety of experimental techniques as well as widely varying theoretical perspectives. Much work in neurolinguistics is informed by models in psycholinguistics and theoretical linguistics, and is focused on investigating how the brain can implement the processes that theoretical and psycholinguistics propose are necessary in producing and comprehending language. Neurolinguists study the physiological mechanisms by which the brain processes information related to language, and evaluate linguistic and psycholinguistic theories, using aphasiology, brain imaging, electrophysiology, and computer modeling. (see complete Wikipedia entry on Neuro Linguistics)

Neurosis ― When used in reference to the field of Analytical Psychology originally a "disease of the nerves'. Freud saw that this was not a disorder of the nervous system, but of personality, arising from the thwarting of instinctual drives. Beyond the broad distinction between neurosis and psychosis Jung does not attempt a comprehensive classification of neurosis. His analysis took the whole of the disturbed psyche as its subject, and he looked on neurosis as reflecting psychic imbalance. Neurotic symptoms may manifest a compensatory and teleological process of self-healing, since they direct the sufferer's attention to his or her psychic dis-ease.

New Aeon English Qabala ― When the term New Aeon English Qabala is used in reference to in the context of Divination, it may refer to any of the interpretative cyphers and systems which have been created based on the English Alphabet. One which uses this exact term, but is frequently called the ALW Cypher, is usually what is meant. This cypher was the earliest created in response to the prediction in the Book of the Law (or Libri 220) in the Thelemic Traditions.

While the use of the term Qabala indicates the potential and desire for a wide ranging and complete system of metaphysics, oriented toward and based on, in this case, the English language, most of the praxis in these systems, at this point, might be termed a type of Gematria. The use and application of Gematria, in these many proposed cyphers, in time are hoped and projected to create large databases of findings, upon which more detailed systems, or Qabalas may be based. It may be that in time, some of the proposed cyphers may be found to be compatible with others and integrated into larger systems, where perhaps one cypher might be used for a particular field of inquiry, while another would be preferred for a different set of questions. Or perhaps different systems will emerge based on each, with the one or ones which attract the most Practitionors, becoming primary.

Each of these proposed cyphers assigns numerical values to letters, and/or sounds in the English language, so that in turn the numerical value of words in that language may be obtained, thus leading to more levels of meaning for words, phrases, and sentences than may be obtained by their surface reading. The different cyphers are developing their own methods and traditions of utility in forming their own Gematrias.

The below value assignments are part of the ALW Cypher:
          A=1     L=2     W=3     H=4     S=5     D=6     O=7     Z=8     K=9     V=10     G=11     R=12     C=13
          N=14     Y=15     J=16     U=17     F=18     Q=19     B=20     M=21     X=22     I=23     T=24     E=25     P=26
The number 11 being critical to the development of this particular cypher makes it particularly attractive, and indeed we have used it to order the navigation keys at the bottom of our pages in this and other sections of the website.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

New Age ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents which holds teachings originating in and/or interpolations thereon as a primary or critical parameter of their Spiritual Paradigm. NEW AGE: A system of beliefs that combines metaphysical practices with a structured religion. New Age Movement is in a class by itself. Unlike most formal religions, it has no holy text, central organization, membership, formal clergy, geographic center, dogma, creed, etc. They often use mutually exclusive definitions for some of their terms. The New Age is in fact a free-flowing spiritual movement; a network of believers and practitioners who share somewhat similar beliefs and practices, which they add on to whichever formal religion that they follow. Their book publishers take the place of a central organization; seminars, conventions, books and informal groups replace of sermons and religious services. Quoting John Naisbitt: "In turbulent times, in times of great change, people head for the two extremes: fundamentalism and personal, spiritual experience...With no membership lists or even a coherent philosophy or dogma, it is difficult to define or measure the unorganized New Age movement. But in every major U.S. and European city, thousands who seek insight and personal growth cluster around a metaphysical bookstore, a spiritual teacher, or an education center." 1 The New Age is definitely a heterogeneous movement of individuals; most graft some new age beliefs onto their regular religious affiliation.

Recent surveys of US adults indicate that many Americans hold at least some new age beliefs:
• 8% believe in astrology as a method of foretelling the future
• 7% believe that crystals are a source of healing or energizing power
• 9% believe that Tarot Cards are a reliable base for life decisions
• about 1 in 4 believe in a non-traditional concept of the nature of God which are often associated with New Age thinking:
          • 11% believe that God is "a state of higher consciousness that a person may reach"
          • 8% define God as "the total realization of personal, human potential"
          • 3% believe that each person is God.
The group of surveys cited above classify religious beliefs into 7 faith groups. Starting with the largest, they are: Cultural (Christmas & Easter) Christianity, Conventional Christianity, New Age Practitioner, Biblical (Fundamentalist, Evangelical) Christianity, Atheist/Agnostic, Other, and Jewish, A longitudinal study from 1991 to 1995 shows that NewAgers represent a steady 20% of the population, and are consistently the third largest religious group.

New Age Beliefs A number of fundamental beliefs are held my many New Age followers; individuals are encouraged to "shop" for the beliefs and practices that they feel most comfortable with:
• Monism: All that exists is derived from a single source of divine energy.
• Pantheism: All that exists is God; God is all that exists. This leads naturally to the concept of the divinity of the individual, that we are all Gods. They do not seek God as revealed in a sacred text or as exists in a remote heaven; they seek God within the self and throughout the entire universe.
• Panentheism: God is all that exists. God is at once the entire universe, and transcends the universe as well.
• Reincarnation: After death, we are reborn and live another life as a human. This cycle repeats itself many times. This belief is similar to the concept of transmigration of the soul in Hinduism.
• Karma: The good and bad deeds that we do adds and subtracts from our accumulated record, our karma. At the end of our life, we are rewarded or punished according to our karma by being reincarnated into either a painful or good new life. This belief is linked to that of reincarnation and is also derived from Hinduism
• An Aura is believed to be an energy field radiated by the body. Invisible to most people, it can be detected by some as a shimmering, multi-colored field surrounding the body. Those skilled in detecting and interpreting auras can diagnose an individual's state of mind, and their spiritual and physical health.
• Personal Transformation A profoundly intense mystical experience will lead to the acceptance and use of New Age beliefs and practices. Guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation, and (sometimes) the use of hallucinogenic drugs are useful to bring about and enhance this transformation. Believers hope to develop new potentials within themselves: the ability to heal oneself and others, psychic powers, a new understanding of the workings of the universe, etc. Later, when sufficient numbers of people have achieved these powers, a major spiritual, physical, psychological and cultural planet-wide transformation is expected.
• Ecological Responsibility: A belief in the importance of uniting to preserve the health of the earth, which is often looked upon as Gaia, (Mother Earth) a living entity.
• Universal Religion: Since all is God, then only one reality exists, and all religions are simply different paths to that ultimate reality. The universal religion can be visualized as a mountain, with many sadhanas (spiritual paths) to the summit. Some are hard; others easy. There is no one correct path. All paths eventually reach the top. They anticipate that a new universal religion that contains elements of all current faiths will evolve and become generally accepted worldwide.
• New World Order as the Age of Aquarius unfolds, a New Age will develop. This will be a utopia in which there is world government, and end to wars, disease, hunger, pollution, and poverty. Gender, racial, religious and other forms of discrimination will cease. People's allegiance to their tribe or nation will be replaced by a concern for the entire world and its people. The Age of Aquarius is a reference to the precession of the zodiac. The earth passes into a new sign of the zodiac approximately every 2,000 years. Some believe that the earth entered the constellation Aquarius in the 19th Century, so that the present era is the dawning of the Age of Aquarius. Others believe that it will occur at the end of the 20th century. It is interesting to note that the previous constellation changes were:
• from Aries to Pisces the fish circa 1st century CE. This happened at a time when Christianity was an emerging religion, and many individuals changed from animal sacrifice in the Jewish temple to embracing the teachings of Christianity. The church's prime symbol at the time was the fish.
• from Taurus to Aries the ram circa 2,000 BCE. This happened at a time when the Jews engaged in widespread ritual sacrifice of sheep and other animals in the Temple.
• from Gemini to Taurus the bull circa 4,000 BCE. During that sign, worshiping of the golden calf was common in the Middle East.

New Age Practices Many practices are common amongst NewAgers. A typical practitioner is active in only a few areas:
• Channeling A method similar to that used by Spiritists in which a spirit of a long dead individual is conjured up. However, while Spiritists generally believe that one's soul remains relatively unchanged after death, most channelers believe that the soul evolves to higher planes of existence. Channelors usually try to make contact with a single, spiritually evolved being. That being's consciousness is channeled through the medium and relays guidance and information to the group, through the use of the medium's voice. Channeling has existed since the 1850's and many groups consider themselves independent of the New Age movement. Perhaps the most famous channeling event is the popular A Course in Miracles. It was channeled through a Columbia University psychologist, Dr. Helen Schucman, (1909-1981), over an 8 year period. She was an Atheist, and in no way regarded herself as a New Age believer. However, she took great care in recording accurately the words that she received.
• Crystals- materials which have its molecules arranged in a specific, highly ordered internal pattern. This pattern is reflected in the crystal's external structure that typically has symmetrical planar surfaces. Many common substances, from salt to sugar, from diamonds to quartz form crystals. They can be shaped so that they will vibrate at a specific frequency and are widely used in radio communications and computing devices. NewAgers believe that crystals possess healing energy.
• Meditating A process of blanking out the mind and releasing oneself from conscious thinking. This is often aided by repetitive chanting of a mantra, or focusing on an object.
• New Age Music A gentle, melodic, inspirational music form involving the human voice, harp, lute, flute, etc. It is used as an aid in healing, massage therapy and general relaxation.
• Divination The use of various techniques to foretell the future, including I Ching, Pendulum movements, Runes, Scrying, Tarot Cards.
• Astrology The belief that the orientation of the planets at the time of one's birth, and the location of that birth predicts the individual's future and personality. Belief in astrology is common amongst NewAgers, but definitely not limited to them.
• Holistic Health This is a collection of healing techniques that have diverged from the traditional medical model. It attempts to cure disorders in mind, body and spirit and to promote wholeness and balance in the individual. Examples are acupuncture, crystal healing, homeopathy, iridology, massage, various meditation methods, polarity therapy, psychic healing, therapeutic touch, reflexology, etc.
• Human Potential Movement (a.k.a. Emotional Growth Movement) This is a collection of therapeutic methods involving both individualized and group working, using both mental and physical techniques. The goal is to help individuals to advance spiritually. Examples are Esalen Growth Center programs, EST, Gestalt Therapy, Primal Scream Therapy, Transactional Analysis, Transcendental Meditation and Yoga.

New Forest Coven

New Moon ― New Moons occur and are noted in various Astronomical and Astrological ways among a variety of Traditions, secular and religious. The moments of the Full Moons, New Moons, and Half Moons are easily determined now to the nearest sixtieth of a second, since they are precisely defined by Astronomical events, and of course can be looked up on the internet from a variety of observatories around the globe. When Garden of Life uses the term New Moon it typically refers to the Celebration of the event, however it might be determined, utilizing the forms and techniques which have become Sacred to our Tradition. Many of these we share in common with the wider Pagan community, ancient and modern; and may be Celebrated in numerous manners from simple personal acknowledgement, to a regular Werking Circle, all points in between and beyond. A time begin new projects, especially of a Spiritual Nature. A powerful time for Individual Work. reclaiming the divine birthright for all who reside on her.

The annual cycle of Moon phases, varies in relation to the Solar Cycle. It is widely known, due to Meton's public relations staff, that in a nineteen year period you can line up the Solar and Lunar cycles almost exactly, by adding 7 intercalary months,. So by considering this longer period, a Tradition can make sure that both their Solar Observances and the Lunar Observances are Celebrated on appropriate dates and with Cycles which line up with the Ḡāēäñ Vegetative Cycle and Life as we experience it, especially the resonances between the Cycle of the Attributions of the Lunar phases, to the Seasonal variations.

More specific information on Moon Names and Attributes may be found at Moon Names; and examples of Moon Name systems at the expanded entry: Naming of Moons

See also: HolyDay, Garden of Life Temple Celebrations, Celebratory Rites and Festivals of ḠĀĒÄ, Lunar Celebratory Rites and Festivals, Solar Celebratory Rites and Festivals, Θê'ēäñäд'äs̄, Sacramental Celebrations, and Informal Spiritual Celebrations

New Reformed Orthodox Order of The Golden Dawn ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents holding as a primary or critical parameter of their Spiritual Paradigm. New Reformed Orthodox Order of the Golden Dawn (NROOGD): Founded in 1969 by Glenna Turner and Aidan Kelly, this group has no connection with the ceremonial magick oriented Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and it recognizes the triple Goddess. Turner, Kelly and several classmates were assigned the task of creating their own rituals for a Witches Sabbat as part of a course on ritual magic at San Francisco State College. The group continued to meet informally until 1969 when they initiated themselves as witches and formed a coven. Active NROOGD covens exist throughout the United States and frequently host large public and semipublic outdoor festivals at Sabbats. [NROOGD] The New Reformed Orthodox Order Of The Golden Dawn is a Wiccan tradition that began 1967 with a group of friends who were students at San Francisco State College. They were given an assignment to created and perform a ritual, and they decided to perform a Witches' Sabbat using the printed sources available at the time, primarily Robert Graves, Margaret Murray, and Gerald Gardner. After doing the ritual several times and feeling the effects of it, they decided to create NROOGD. The name is a play on the attitudes they had toward what they were doing and upon their spiritual antecedents. The tradition worships a triple-aspect Goddess and various forms of the God derived from ancient Greek and British mythology. Covens are autonomous, but share a common liturgy and recognize one another's initiates. There is no central authority nor spokesperson for the tradition.

New Thought ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents holding as a primary or critical parameter of their Spiritual Paradigm.

Nietzschean

Nietzschean (?Anti-)Ethics ― http://www-philosophy.ucdavis.edu/phi001/Nietzlec.htm 1994 Lecture Notes Now we turn to a philosopher who was in no way delicate, but said that he wanted to philosophize with a hammer. Friedrich Nietzsche is a philosopher much misunderstood in his own time and especially in the first half of the 20th century, when he was adopted by the Nazis as having given the theoretical basis to National Socialism. This came about largely because his philosophy was distorted by his sister, who was married to a notorious racist activist. In the latter half of this century, he has been rehabilitated and is now one of the hottest philosophers around. I will mention a couple of reasons for his current popularity in the course of the discussion of his views. One of the themes of the ethical theories of the Greeks was that moral goodness is a kind of healthy functioning of the human being. In Nietzsche's view, the human condition is one of profound illness. Its symptoms are to be found everywhere, but nowhere more prominently than in the world's religions. Eastern religions, such as Buddhism, have as their ultimate goal emptiness, nothingness. They are nihilistic, seeking only release from life. Western religions, led by Christianity, are even worse, according to Nietzsche. So hostile are they to life that they hold before us the promise of eternal torture. So the modern condition is one in which the masses of people say "No" to life. Nietzsche attempted to account for the modern condition through an explanation of its development. In the pre-human condition (compare Hobbes' state of nature), people distinguished by their strength, vitality, courage form a kind of natural nobility or aristocracy. They get their own way through the exercise of power. (One reason for Nietzsche's recent popularity is the widely-held view that power-relations are at the basis of all social institutions.) Even if he were to grant with Hobbes that these noble ones were themselves vulnerable to sudden death, Nietzsche would say that they would laugh at the prospect, for putting a value on one's own life is a later development. Eventually the masses were subdued by the nobility and civil society began. A necessary condition of society is a system of exchange, which requires that values be placed on things. Here is the origin of human rationality, in the reckoning of values and equivalences. The placing of things in equivalent categories is the basis of the use of general concepts, which therefore is always practical, on Nietzsche's view. Though now subdued, the human community could hardly have lost its animal instincts overnight. The discharge of the urges of power remains a necessity, but bound by obligations and prohibitions, social man is unable to continue in his wild ways. The pent-up vitality must be directed somewhere, and the only place it can go is inward. Thus the "human soul" is refined as the target of our own aggression. Thus the sickness of the modern human being is self-inflicted. We tear ourselves down in the way a caged animal rubs its skin raw chafing at the cage which confines it. The cure for this sickness is not to be found in the human race as it presently exists. The product is fatally flawed: we have made ourselves what we are, and there is no turning back to the days before the rationality leveled the chief distinctions among us. The only hope is the development of a new form, an "overman," to go beyond the rigid moral categories of good and evil which have grown up around, and are inextricable from, the human race. Incidentally, this shows why the Nazi notion of the German (more broadly, "Aryan") people as a master race finds no basis in Nietzsche. Whatever their virtues or vices, the German people share in the basic sickness of the modern human being. To this day, Nietzsche's readers identify themselves as the nobility, as the powerful ones to whom the categories of good and evil do not apply, doubtless this is another reason for Nietzsche's popularity. But this distorts Nietzsche's meaning grotesquely.

The Will to Power: All life seeks to increase its own power.
Proponents: Friederich Nietzsche (German)
Notes: It is said that Nietzsche got the idea for the Will to Power while watching an army parading downtown Berlin. The Will to Power isn't a clear statement on what is right and wrong, though, which is why I haven't written one in. It is, rather, a factual statement, an observation that all life seeks to become stronger, and constantly seeks to perfect itself, and we would all be better off if we admitted that. So Nietzsche is probably doing psychology rather than ethics, but he is describing how humans come to acquire ethics, which is why he is of interest to philosophers. Ethics cannot exist apart from human feelings, so it must be something different for each individual, but it will eventually come down to power. In his book Thus Spoke Zarathustra, written after he resigned from a teaching position due to ill health, he attacks Christian morality as the morality for the "weak herd", or people who willingly let others tell them what is right and wrong (thus, they give away their power). He also attacked those who taught morality on the basis of rewards in the afterlife, because life can be celebrated while we still live it. "Live dangerously" says the Overman, (sometimes translated as "Superman") who incorporates both the good and evil parts of his being, both the rational Apollonian and wild Dionysian elements of humanity, into a new virtue. The Overman takes power over himself; he is his own creator of good and evil, and also his own judge and jury if need be. Sadly Nietzsche himself fell prey to an illness that destroyed his mind ten years before taking his body. But his ideas influenced many existentialists and egoists in the century following his death.
Criticisms: Nietzsche's writings were used by Nazi propagandists to promote their ideals of a Master race; though this is clearly way off what Nietzsche intended, his writing style is often open to a wide variety of bizarre interpretations. The most common misinterpretation is the mistaking of his factual claims for moral claims. One major criticism is that if one wishes to be an Overman, one is absolutely accountable for each and every act undertaken. But if you think about it, we already are no matter what ethic we believe in.

Nihilism ― When used in reference to a point of view within the field of Ethical, Value and/or Behavioural Matters, this is a Point of View in which the prime parameter for effectuating a course of action is determined by choosing that which is Nihilism is the belief that all values are baseless and that nothing can be known or communicated. It is often associated with extreme pessimism and a radical skepticism that condemns existence. A true nihilist would believe in nothing, have no loyalties, and no purpose other than, perhaps, an impulse to destroy. While few philosophers would claim to be nihilists, nihilism is most often associated with Friedrich Nietzsche who argued that its corrosive effects would eventually destroy all moral, religious, and Metaphysical convictions and precipitate the greatest crisis in human history. In the 20th century, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Mid-century, for example, the existentialists helped popularize tenets of nihilism in their attempts to blunt its destructive potential. By the end of the century, existential despair as a response to nihilism gave way to an attitude of indifference, often associated with antifoundationalism. "Nihilism" comes from the Latin nihil, or nothing, which means not anything, that which does not exist. It appears in the verb "annihilate," meaning to bring to nothing, to destroy completely. Early in the nineteenth century, Friedrich Jacobi used the word to negatively characterize transcendental idealism. It only became popularized, however, after its appearance in Ivan Turgenev's novel Fathers and Sons (1862) where he used "nihilism" to describe the crude scientism espoused by his character Bazarov who preaches a creed of total negation.

In Russia, nihilism became identified with a loosely organized revolutionary movement (C.1860-1917) that rejected the authority of the state, church, and family. In his early writing, anarchist leader Mikhael Bakunin (1814-1876) composed the notorious entreaty still identified with nihilism: "Let us put our trust in the eternal spirit which destroys and annihilates only because it is the unsearchable and eternally creative source of all life--the passion for destruction is also a creative passion!" (Reaction in Germany, 1842). The movement advocated a social arrangement based on rationalism and materialism as the sole source of knowledge and individual freedom as the highest goal. By rejecting man's spiritual essence in favor of a solely materialistic one, nihilists denounced God and religious authority as antithetical to freedom. The movement eventually deteriorated into an ethos of subversion, destruction, and anarchy, and by the late 1870s, a nihilist was anyone associated with clandestine political groups advocating terrorism and assassination. The earliest philosophical positions associated with what could be characterized as a nihilistic outlook are those of the Skeptics. Because they denied the possibility of certainty, Skeptics could denounce traditional truths as unjustifiable opinions. When Demosthenes (c.371-322 BC), for example, observes that "What he wished to believe, that is what each man believes" (Olynthiac), he posits the relational nature of knowledge. Extreme skepticism, then, is linked to epistemological nihilism which denies the possibility of knowledge and truth; this form of nihilism is currently identified with postmodern antifoundationalism. Nihilism, in fact, can be understood in several different ways. Political Nihilism, as noted, is associated with the belief that the destruction of all existing political, social, and religious order is a prerequisite for any future improvement. Ethical nihilism or moral nihilism rejects the possibility of absolute moral or ethical values. Instead, good and evil are nebulous, and values addressing such are the product of nothing more than social and emotive pressures. Existential nihilism is the notion that life has no intrinsic meaning or value, and it is, no doubt, the most commonly used and understood sense of the word today. Max Stirner's (1806-1856) attacks on systematic philosophy, his denial of absolutes, and his rejection of abstract concepts of any kind often places him among the first philosophical nihilists. For Stirner, achieving individual freedom is the only law; and the state, which necessarily imperils freedom, must be destroyed. Even beyond the oppression of the state, though, are the constraints imposed by others because their very existence is an obstacle compromising individual freedom. Thus Stirner argues that existence is an endless "war of each against all" (The Ego and its Own, trans. 1907).
Friedrich Nietzsche and Nihilism
Among philosophers, Friedrich Nietzsche is most often associated with nihilism. For Nietzsche, there is no objective order or structure in the world except what we give it. Penetrating the façades buttressing convictions, the nihilist discovers that all values are baseless and that reason is impotent. "Every belief, every considering something-true," Nietzsche writes, "is necessarily false because there is simply no true world" (Will to Power [notes from 1883-1888]). For him, nihilism requires a radical repudiation of all imposed values and meaning: "Nihilism is . . . not only the belief that everything deserves to perish; but one actually puts one's shoulder to the plough; one destroys" (Will to Power).
The caustic strength of nihilism is absolute, Nietzsche argues, and under its withering scrutiny "the highest values devalue themselves. The aim is lacking, and 'Why' finds no answer" (Will to Power). Inevitably, nihilism will expose all cherished beliefs and sacrosanct truths as symptoms of a defective Western mythos. This collapse of meaning, relevance, and purpose will be the most destructive force in history, constituting a total assault on reality and nothing less than the greatest crisis of humanity:
What I relate is the history of the next two centuries. I describe what is coming, what can no longer come differently: the advent of nihilism. . . . For some time now our whole European culture has been moving as toward a catastrophe, with a tortured tension that is growing from decade to decade: restlessly, violently, headlong, like a river that wants to reach the end. . . . (Will to Power) Since Nietzsche's compelling critique, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Convinced that Nietzsche's analysis was accurate, for example, Oswald Spengler in The Decline of the West (1926) studied several cultures to confirm that patterns of nihilism were indeed a conspicuous feature of collapsing civilizations. In each of the failed cultures he examines, Spengler noticed that centuries-old religious, artistic, and political traditions were weakened and finally toppled by the insidious workings of several distinct nihilistic postures: the Faustian nihilist "shatters the ideals"; the Apollinian nihilist "watches them crumble before his eyes"; and the Indian nihilist "withdraws from their presence into himself." Withdrawal, for instance, often identified with the negation of reality and resignation advocated by Eastern religions, is in the West associated with various versions of epicureanism and stoicism. In his study, Spengler concludes that Western civilization is already in the advanced stages of decay with all three forms of nihilism working to undermine epistemological authority and ontological grounding.
In 1927, Martin Heidegger, to cite another example, observed that nihilism in various and hidden forms was already "the normal state of man" (The Question of Being). Other philosophers' predictions about nihilism's impact have been dire. Outlining the symptoms of nihilism in the 20th century, Helmut Thielicke wrote that "Nihilism literally has only one truth to declare, namely, that ultimately Nothingness prevails and the world is meaningless" (Nihilism: Its Origin and Nature, with a Christian Answer, 1969). From the nihilist's perspective, one can conclude that life is completely amoral, a conclusion, Thielicke believes, that motivates such monstrosities as the Nazi reign of terror. Gloomy predictions of nihilism's impact are also charted in Eugene Rose's Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age (1994). If nihilism proves victorious--and it's well on its way, he argues--our world will become "a cold, inhuman world" where "nothingness, incoherence, and absurdity" will triumph.
Existential Nihilism
While nihilism is often discussed in terms of extreme skepticism and relativism, for most of the 20th century it has been associated with the belief that life is meaningless. Existential nihilism begins with the notion that the world is without meaning or purpose. Given this circumstance, existence itself--all action, suffering, and feeling--is ultimately senseless and empty. In The Dark Side: Thoughts on the Futility of Life (1994), Alan Pratt demonstrates that existential nihilism, in one form or another, has been a part of the Western intellectual tradition from the beginning. The Skeptic Empedocles' observation that "the life of mortals is so mean a thing as to be virtually unlife," for instance, embodies the same kind of extreme pessimism associated with existential nihilism. In antiquity, such profound pessimism may have reached its apex with Hegesis. Because miseries vastly outnumber pleasures, happiness is impossible, the philosopher argues, and subsequently advocates suicide. Centuries later during the Renaissance, William Shakespeare eloquently summarized the existential nihilist's perspective when, in this famous passage near the end of Macbeth, he has Macbeth pour out his disgust for life:
              Out, out, brief candle!
              Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
              That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
              And then is heard no more; it is a tale
              Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
              Signifying nothing.
In the twentieth century, it's the atheistic existentialist movement, popularized in France in the 1940s and 50s, that is responsible for the currency of existential nihilism in the popular consciousness. Jean-Paul Sartre's (1905-1980) defining preposition for the movement, "existence precedes essence," rules out any ground or foundation for establishing an essential self or a human nature. When we abandon illusions, life is revealed as nothing; and for the existentialists, nothingness is the source of not only absolute freedom but also existential horror and emotional anguish. Nothingness reveals each individual as an isolated being "thrown" into an alien and unresponsive universe, barred forever from knowing why yet required to invent meaning. It's a situation that's nothing short of absurd. Writing from the enlightened perspective of the absurd, Albert Camus (1913-1960) observed that Sisyphus' plight, condemned to eternal, useless struggle, was a superb metaphor for human existence (The Myth of Sisyphus, 1942).
The common thread in the literature of the existentialists is coping with the emotional anguish arising from our confrontation with nothingness, and they expended great energy responding to the question of whether surviving it was possible. Their answer was a qualified "Yes," advocating a formula of passionate commitment and impassive stoicism. In retrospect, it was an anecdote tinged with desperation because in an absurd world there are absolutely no guidelines, and any course of action is problematic. Passionate commitment, be it to conquest, creation, or whatever, is itself meaningless. Enter nihilism.
Camus, like the other existentialists, was convinced that nihilism was the most vexing problem of the twentieth century. Although he argues passionately that individuals could endure its corrosive effects, his most famous works betray the extraordinary difficulty he faced building a convincing case. In The Stranger (1942), for example, Meursault has rejected the existential suppositions on which the uninitiated and weak rely. Just moments before his execution for a gratuitous murder, he discovers that life alone is reason enough for living, a raison d'être, however, that in context seems scarcely convincing. In Caligula (1944), the mad emperor tries to escape the human predicament by dehumanizing himself with acts of senseless violence, fails, and surreptitiously arranges his own assassination. The Plague (1947) shows the futility of doing one's best in an absurd world. And in his last novel, the short and sardonic, The Fall (1956), Camus posits that everyone has bloody hands because we are all responsible for making a sorry state worse by our inane action and inaction alike. In these works and other works by the existentialists, one is often left with the impression that living authentically with the meaninglessness of life is impossible.
Camus was fully aware of the pitfalls of defining existence without meaning, and in his philosophical essay The Rebel (1951) he faces the problem of nihilism head-on. In it, he describes at length how Metaphysical collapse often ends in total negation and the victory of nihilism, characterized by profound hatred, pathological destruction, and incalculable violence and death.
Antifoundationalism and Nihilism
By the late 20th century, "nihilism" had assumed two different castes. In one form, "nihilist" is used to characterize the postmodern man, a dehumanized conformist, alienated, indifferent, and baffled, directing psychological energy into hedonistic narcissism or into a deep ressentiment that often explodes in violence. This perspective is derived from the existentialists' reflections on nihilism stripped of any hopeful expectations, leaving only the experience of sickness, decay, and disintegration.
In his study of meaninglessness, Donald Crosby writes that the source of modern nihilism paradoxically stems from a commitment to honest intellectual openness. "Once set in motion, the process of questioning could come to but one end, the erosion of conviction and certitude and collapse into despair" (The Specter of the Absurd, 1988). When sincere inquiry is extended to moral convictions and social consensus, it can prove deadly, Crosby continues, promoting forces that ultimately destroy civilizations. Michael Novak's recently revised The Experience of Nothingness (1968, 1998) tells a similar story. Both studies are responses to the existentialists' gloomy findings from earlier in the century. And both optimistically discuss ways out of the abyss by focusing of the positive implications nothingness reveals, such as liberty, freedom, and creative possibilities. Novak, for example, describes how since WWII we have been working to "climb out of nihilism" on the way to building a new civilization. In contrast to the efforts to overcome nihilism noted above is the uniquely postmodern response associated with the current antifoundationalists. The philosophical, ethical, and intellectual crisis of nihilism that has tormented modern philosophers for over a century has given way to mild annoyance or, more interestingly, an upbeat acceptance of meaninglessness. French philosopher Jean-Francois Lyotard characterizes postmodernism as an "incredulity toward metanarratives," those all-embracing foundations that we have relied on to make sense of the world. This extreme skepticism has undermined intellectual and moral hierarchies and made "truth" claims, transcendental or transcultural, problematic. Postmodern antifoundationalists, paradoxically grounded in relativism, dismiss knowledge as relational and "truth" as transitory, genuine only until something more palatable replaces it (reminiscent of William James' notion of "cash value"). The critic Jacques Derrida, for example, asserts that one can never be sure that what one knows corresponds with what is. Since human beings participate in only an infinitesimal part of the whole, they are unable to grasp anything with certainty, and absolutes are merely "fictional forms." American antifoundationalist Richard Rorty makes a similar point: "Nothing grounds our practices, nothing legitimizes them, nothing shows them to be in touch with the way things are" ("From Logic to Language to Play," 1986). This epistemological cul-de-sac, Rorty concludes, leads inevitably to nihilism. "Faced with the nonhuman, the nonlinguistic, we no longer have the ability to overcome contingency and pain by appropriation and transformation, but only the ability to recognize contingency and pain" (Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity, 1989). In contrast to Nietzsche's fears and the angst of the existentialists, nihilism becomes for the antifoundationalists just another aspect of our contemporary milieu, one best endured with sang-froid. In The Banalization of Nihilism (1992) Karen Carr discusses the antifoundationalist response to nihilism. Although it still inflames a paralyzing relativism and subverts critical tools, "cheerful nihilism" carries the day, she notes, distinguished by an easy-going acceptance of meaninglessness. Such a development, Carr concludes, is alarming. If we accept that all perspectives are equally non-binding, then intellectual or moral arrogance will determine which perspective has precedence. Worse still, the banalization of nihilism creates an environment where ideas can be imposed forcibly with little resistance, raw power alone determining intellectual and moral hierarchies. It's a conclusion that dovetails nicely with Nietzsche's, who pointed out that all interpretations of the world are simply manifestations of will-to-power. Conclusion: It has been over a century now since Nietzsche explored nihilism and its implications for civilization. As he predicted, nihilism's impact on the culture and values of the 20th century has been pervasive, its apocalyptic tenor spawning a mood of gloom and a good deal of anxiety, anger, and terror. Interestingly, Nietzsche himself, a radical skeptic preoccupied with language, knowledge, and truth, anticipated many of the themes of postmodernity. It's helpful to note, then, that he believed we could--at a terrible price--eventually work through nihilism. If we survived the process of destroying all interpretations of the world, we could then perhaps discover the correct course for humankind: I praise, I do not reproach, [nihilism's] arrival. I believe it is one of the greatest crises, a moment of the deepest self-reflection of humanity. Whether man recovers from it, whether he becomes master of this crisis, is a question of his strength. It is possible. . . . (Complete Works Vol. 13)

Niyamas (One of the Eight Limbs of Raja Yoga from the Traditions of the Indus Valley) ― Inner Disciplines or the Niyamas or observances (Do's) are also divided into five and complete the ethical precepts started with the Yama. These qualities are:
          Shauca or purity - (internal and external cleanliness, at all levels).
          Santosha or contentment
          Tapas or detachment from bondage to anything, discipline of body, mind and speech, some practice austerity for this
          Swadhyaya or study of the sacred texts
          Ishwara Pranidhana which is living constant awareness of the Divine

Nomancy and Noscopy ― When the term Nomancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination utilizing names, especially by examining the letters which make up a name, or combination of names.

The term Nomancy is derived from the Latin word Nōmen, meaning name [from the Greek Ὄνομα (onoma), possibly from the Proto-Indo-European Nomn-.], and the Greek word Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See: Onomancy

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Nominalism

Nomos ― Nomos as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Νόμος (1) law; (2) custom; (3) tradition

See also: Νόμος

Nomos Arkhaios ― Nomos Arkhaios as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Νόμος Ἀρχαῖος ancient tradition, law, or customs

See also: Νόμος Ἀρχαῖος

NonCorporeal Entities

NonInstrumentalism ― When used in reference to a point of view within the field of Ethical, Value and/or Behavioural Matters, this is a Point of View in which the prime parameter for effectuating a course of action is determined by choosing that which is

Non-Local

Non-Locality

Nordic ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents which holds teachings originating in and/or interpolations thereon as a primary or critical parameter of their Spiritual Paradigm. Nordic Tradition, Norse Paganism: Pagan traditions that worship the Norse pantheon of deities and stresses conservative values of honor, honesty, courage and duty to one's family, kin and friends. In the 1970's a number of Norse Pagan groups sprang into existence almost simultaneously and independently of one another, in America, England an Iceland. The emphasis on blood ties and genetics, the warrior ethic and the Norse symbology attract many adherents to Norse Paganism. Norse Pagans recognize both branches of the Norse pantheon, the Aesir and the Vanir. A branch called Odhinnism worship only the Aesir. Festivals center on the seasonal equinoxes and solstices, and Norse holidays such as Ragnar's Day. Heavier emphasis is placed on skill mastery and shamanism than on magick and meditation. There are a few extreme right-wing Norse Pagan groups who believe they have founded a religion upon the Aryan race; and while some do include neo-Nazis, most Norse Pagans consider these people a fringe element not connected to their religion. Also known as Teutonic Tradition. See also: Odhinnism.

North Isles ― This tradition was heavily influenced by the Norse and is prominent in the Orkney and Shetland Islands of Scotland. To this day, many ancient Nordic celebrations are still held.

North Isles Tradition ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents holding as a primary or critical parameter of their Spiritual Paradigm.

Northern Hemisphere of Ḡāēä

Notarikon ― A form of Gematria in which the first and last letters of a word or phrase are put together to create a new word, or to turn a word into a phrase. Gematria is a system of discovering truths and hidden meanings behind words, using numerical values for letters of the alphabet. Each letter corresponds to a number. The numerical values of words are totaled and interpreted in terms of other words with the same numerical value. Gematria dates back to the 8th century BC Babylon, and has been used by most mystics since that time including the Magi, Gnostics, and Qabalists. Temurah is a form of Gematria that creates anagrams through systematic letter substitutions. Related to Numerology.

Notariqon ― Notariqon there are two forms. In the first every letter of a word is taken for the initial or abbreviation of another word, so that from the letters of a word a sentence may be formed. The second form of Notariqon is that exact reverse of the first. By this the initials or finals, or both or the medials, of a sentence, are taken to form a word or words.

Noumenia ― Noumenia as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Νουμήνία the new moon (first visible sliver after the dark moon)

See also: Νουμήνία

Numinousism ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation of Experiential Spiritual Methodology, which is ordinarily characterized by much emphasis being placed on

Numinousist

Nous ― Nous as an Anglicized term from the actual Greek Νοῦς (1) mind, intellect; (2) cosmic mind

See also: Νοῦς

Nova Roma ― dedicated to the restoration of traditional Roman culture, religion and virtues: http://www.novaroma.org/

Novocentomancy and Novocentoscopy ― When the term Novocentomancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination by calling '1-900' numbers for TV psychics.

This rare and obviously esoteric term Novocentomancy, is derived from the Latin words, Novem meaning nine, Centum meaning hundred [or, if you like, Cento meaning patchwork garment, metaphorically hotchpotch, mixture of any kind], and the Greek word Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Numen (pl. Numina) ― The term Numen indicates the Spirit; Divine Force; Deity; Divinity; Presiding Spirit; Animistic Spirit; Divine Power; and/or Creative Energy which presides over a particular place, thing, or category of object or abstraction. see also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci , Amulet , Talisman, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Numenomancy and Numenoscopy ― When the term Numenomancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination using that which is Numinous, i.e.: non-corporeal emanations from persons, places or things; the emanations part being key. It refers not to the Divinity, Holy Place, and/or Sacred Implement, but to an ineffable something, which may be visible in some manner to certain people, which is produced by, and flows from, Divine Forms, Holy Places, and/or Sacred Implements in question.

Another area of phenomena which may be investigated in these types of divinations are anything which may be perceived as indications of the Werkings of Divine Forces, whether originating in entities, places, and/or objects. The Numinous is the perceivable display of some sort of preternatural power radiating from the intrinsic essence of that which is outside of the known workings of the consensus reality. Karl Gustav Jung also utilized the term Numinous to refer to any spiritual experience involving some kind of alteration of ego-based consciousness, or what are often referred to as Altered States of Consciousness . It may also be of benefit to consider the Sanatana Dharma idea of Darśana in reference to the Numinous.

The term Numenomancy is derived from the Latin Numen (gen. Numinis), meaning divine will, or perhaps more precisely the indication of divine approval expressed by nodding the head, and the Greek word Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination. Has to do with Νεῦμα (Neuma), meaning nod, or sign, from Nuere which means to nod, perhaps going all the way back to the putative Proto-Indo-European *neu- meaning to nod. A Greek term for the same ineffable quality indicated in Latin by Numen, is Δαιμόνιον (Daimonion) meaning Divine Power, Emanations, Extrusions, Indications; Divinity, Divine Operation. Δυνητικός (Dunhtikos) meaning potential.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Numerology ― When the term Numerology is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers the study of the various intrinsic and peripheral qualities imbued in numbers; and secondarily to divination with numbers, obtained by various procedures, to determine overall personality traits and life essences. Numerology, due to some characteristics which it shares with Astrology (though not to the same extent), is much more widespread, and even grudgingly accepted in modern culture, than most types of divination systems. Some of these characteristics, which aide in their semi-mainstreamness, include more scientific and especially mathematical, and computational methodologies which they utilize. Though truthfully the anecdotal evidence of success and applicability of their results is what gives them most of their leverage. that so many people find resonance, to a greater or lessor extent, with the readings which result from all these calculations, or find them applicable to their lives, or to their impressions of their friends and lovers, for which the divinations are performed.

A type of divination with numbers often to determine overall personality traits and life essences. A lot of what we call Numerology today draws primarily from the systems of Magick and Divination developed by Πυθαγόρας ὁ Σάμιος (Pythagoras of Samos) and those based on his concepts. In most systems of Numerology, all words, names and numbers may be reduced to single or at the most double digits that correspond to certain occult characteristics which are thought to influence one's life. Numerology is used to analyze a person's character; assess weaknesses, strengths and natural gifts; predict one's future and fate; determine the best place to live; and discover the best times to make decisions and take action. The study of the connection of numbers and their manifestation throughout all aspects of nature and the universe. Numerologists, typically use your birth name and date to analyze this relationship. Some of the Ancient Ægyptian Mystery Traditions hold that numbers hold the key to the entire Kosmos and all that it contains and suggests. The idea is that numbers carry specific quality as well as quantity of information. Pythagorean, Platonic, and Hermetic schools used numeric symbolism and interrelationships as a basis for teaching

The term Numerology is derived from the Latin Numerus meaning number; and a group of words including Λογομανέω (Logomaneo), meaning to have a passion for study. Λόγος (Logos) meaning computation, reckoning, and Λογεία (Logeia) meaning collection.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Numeromancy and Numeroscopy ― When the term Numeromancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination using numbers.

The term Numeromancy is derived from the Latin word Numerus meaning number, and the Greek word Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination. If you wish to use a more consistently derived Greek term Arithmancy, sometimes indicated as Arithmomancy, may work.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Numinal ― The Numinal is one of the realms of Reality outside the physical consensus Reality. It is considered to be a level where the Divine Forces are able to work in a more direct fashion than on the physical levels. From numen.

Numinous ― When the term Numinous is utilized in reference to an experience, place, and/or person it generally indicates perception on the part of the observer of a tinge of Sacral otherworldliness to such, which is not easy to pin down in words, yet which is easily recognizable, and evokes some combination of awe, fear, and attraction. That which is infused with awe and wonder creating attributes, having to do with the Sacred, Holy, Spiritual and/or Otherworldly occurrences and/or impressions. Of or Related to Divinities or Divine Forces; Filled With Divine Presence; Spiritually Elevated, Sublime. From numen.

See also: ,

Numinousism ― infusion with awe and wonder towards the holy, spiritual and/or otherworldly occurrences and/or impressions

Numinousist

Nurturance

Nutrition ― The science of balancing the intake of nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and amino acids. Nutrition concerns everything that the body does with food to sustain life and growth. What you eat affects your health and enjoyment in life. Healthy eating and a positive attitude can improve the body's use of food.


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Definitions, Premisses, and Info Index by Sound and Letter

Capital A with ring aboveÅ   Capital A with macronĀ   Capital A with breveĂ   Capital A with diaeresisÄ   Capital A with circumflex   Capital A with dot aboveȦ   Capital A with inverted breveȂ   Capital A with tildeà   Capital A with ogonekĄ   Capital AE ligatureÆ   Capital AE ligature with tildeÆ̃   Capital Glottal Stop   Capital Palatoalveolar Click   Regular English AA   Script Capital L   Capital L with macron above   Capital L with dot below   Capital L with stroke, Dark L Ł   Regular English LL   Capital WHω   Capital W with macron above   Capital W with dot below   Regular English WW   Capital Slide H with reverse solidusℋ⃥   Capital H with macron above   Capital H with dot below   Aspirate   Slight Pause   Very Slight Pause   Regular English HH   Capital S with macron above   Capital S with dot above   Capital SH sign   Capital SKΣ   Regular English SS   Hard and Deep Capital DД   High and Light Capital D   Regular English DD   Capital O with ring above   Capital O with macronŌ   Capital O with breveŎ   Capital O with diaeresisÖ   Capital O with solidusØ   Capital OE ligatureŒ   Capital O with Cyrillic Round OmegaѺ   Capital OI   Capital O with ogonekǪ   Capital O with double oo top   Regular English OO   Capital EZJHʑ   Capital Z with macron below   Capital Z with dot aboveŻ   Regular English ZZ   Capital K with macron aboveК̅   Capital K with dot below К̣   Capital Hard KHχ   Capital KHƙ   Regular English KK   Capital V with macron above   Capital V with dot below   Regular English VV   Capital G with macron   Capital G with dot aboveĠ   Capital GNΓ   Capital GRЖ   Capital GWCapital GW   Capital Uvular Voiced ImplosiveϘ   Regular English GG   Capital rolled R with macronЯ̅   Capital rolled R with dot aboveЯ̇   Capital R with macron above   Capital R with dot above   Capital R with ogonek   Regular English RR   Capital C with cedillaÇ   Capital CHЧ   Regular English CC   Capital N with macron above   Capital N with dot below   Capital N with tildeÑ   Capital NGŋ   Capital NG with macron aboveŋ̅   Regular English NN   Capital Y with macron above Ȳ   Capital Y with dot above   Capital Y with yaw aboveЎ   Regular English YY   Capital J with macron aboveЈ̅   Capital J with dot belowЈ̣   Regular English JJ   Capital U with a ring aboveŮ   Capital U with macronŪ   Capital U with breveŬ   Capital U with circumflex aboveÛ   Capital U with diaeresisÜ   Regular English UU   Capital F with macron above   Capital F with dot above   Regular English FF   Capital Q with macron above   Capital Q with dot above   Regular English QQ   Capital B with macron   Capital B with dot below   Trilled BTrilled B   Regular English BB   Capital M with macron   Capital M with dot below   Capital M with tilde   Capital MBCapital MB   Capital MG   Regular English MM   Capital X with macron above   Capital X with dot above   Regular English XX   Capital I with macronĪ   Capital I with breveĬ   Regular English II   Capital T with macron above   Capital T with dot below   Capital TH voicedΘ   Capital TH voicelessÞ   Capital TSЦ   Capital TSCHЩ   Regular English TT   Capital E with macronĒ   Capital E with breveĔ   Capital E with circumflexÊ   Capital schwa Ə   Regular English EE   Capital P with macron above   Capital P with dot above   Capital pTCapital pT   Regular English PP

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