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Definitions, Premisses, and Info in Trinculo Font
Special Note: Garden of Life uses a large number of specially purposed English words, often spelled slightly differently than regular, to make their specific meaning more apparent. We also use a large number of neologisms, specifically constructed for Temple use. All of this type of terminology is defined in several places on the website, here in the Garden of Life website Definitions pages, in the Articles of Organization glossary, and such. If you are viewing this page in a browser which doesn't support full current Unicode coding or if you haven't installed current free Unicode fonts, such as Code2000 version 1.171 at FontSpace or Alphabetical List of Unicode Fonts, many of the phonetic characters, diacritical marks, and symbols in these pages will not show up or will show up as boxes. Availability changes so you may have to do a search. It's a free font for personal use, so we can send you a copy if you can't find it. And the display probably won't be perfect anyway, but it's getting closer all the time. At the risk of belabouring the extremely obvious, this page is a work in progress, with quite a distance to go before it sleeps. All of these Attributions are from our perspective. We are not putting them forward as objective fact. We welcome all feedback at Defs@gardenoflifetemple.com, though we do not guarantee to process such feedback other than for ascertainable accuracy and usefulness. Thanks.
 

☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ Ů ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽

 

☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ Ū ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽

 

Ūñōṃ'm̄ēä (nomenclature vulgaris: Eunomia) (Local Star System Component) ― Ūñōṃ'm̄ēä is the name used in Garden of Life Astrological Terminology for the component of our local star system (in this case an Asteroid), referred to as "Eunomia" in the Western mainstream vernacular. Garden of Life uses either terms from the earlier Ægean languages or words constructed from root words in those languages for all components of the Cosmos, or at least for those of the local Universe; partially due to a feeling that the earlier terms represent a more exact and purer resonance with the named object, force, and/or field, than the Latinate term commonly used (theory of deterioration of quality in a copy of a copy of a copy, etc.); and partially because, though we sometimes use, within the Temple, terms for these components derived from Ægyptian culture, and in some cases Sanatana Dharma and Sanskrit, and/or other ancient sources, those seemed a bit "over the top" for daily use (but we never can tell). Also there was a desire to rebalance the Feminine and Masculine Energies in the naming of the Planets and other components of the local star system.

☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ Ŭ ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽

 

☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ Û ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽

 

☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ Ü ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽

 

☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ ☾ U ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽ ☽

 

Uadjet ― When the term Uadjet is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool and/or Focus it generally refers to the Ægyptian figure of the Eye, right, left or both, specifically made for general or particular Mægikal Werking, and/or consecrated to the same.

see also: Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci , Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Ubiquinyms ― We are defining Ubiquinym to include words and/or phrases that may be used to mean anything, or nearly (Ubiquitous Words or Phrases, if you will). [ . . . by the power invested . . . etcetera] Some common readily known examples are: "Dude", "Sweet", "Cool" English is not normally a Tonal Language, i.e.: the tone of voice doesn't usually affect the meaning of the words. In Ubiquinyms this is totally contravened. In Ubiquinyms the tone practically is the meaning. For a word or phrase to be a Ubiquinym it's range or set of possible meanings should include at least several mutually contradictory meanings, indicated by the tone in which they are said. Sarcasm, Irony, Inuendo, Facetiousity and Satire all receive heavy play in Ubiquinyms as do Misdirection and Inside Jokes and Slang.
See also: Ubiquinyms, Garden of Life WordPlay Index, and Word Play in Definitions

Ufology ― The study of and interest in UFOs. (see: Extraterrestrial Focal Spiritual Traditions for UFOs in relation to Spirituality, also Borderlands)

Ŭh⃥'h⃥ĕm̄'m̃ēṭ·ƙжǫn̄ ― Ŭh⃥'h⃥ĕm̄'m̃ēṭ·ƙжǫn̄ (Similar to the Greek: Τριπλόος (~Triploos) which means Thrice-Repeated) is a term that we use to indicate those instances, whether in writing or speech, a form of repetition, where the concepts are repeated three times for Spiritual Emphasis. Sometimes it is important for the repetitions to be exact, and in other cases, the concept is repeated but using different wordings, and/or metaphors each time, or perhaps different in the middle instance with the first and third identical.
See also: Ŭh⃥'h⃥ĕm̄'m̃ēṭ·ƙжǫn̄, Garden of Life WordPlay Index, and Word Play in Definitions

Ultimate Potential Perfection ― The Perfected State that each being reaches in Attainment at the destination of their particular Way of Going.

Umbanda ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents holding a Macumba WorldView as a primary or critical parameter of their Spiritual Paradigm. Macumba is not in itself a religion but the umbrella for the two principal forms of African spirit worship in Brazil, related to Vodoun and Santaria which are Candomblé and Umbanda. Macumba is sometimes used to refer to harmful magick, but that is more properly called Quimbanda.

Uncanniness ― ontologically indeterminate presence

Unconscious ― When used in reference to the field of Analytical Psychology in analytical psychology, as in psychoanalysis, the existence of the unconscious, with its own laws and functions, is presupposed. It is capable of autonomously affecting and interrupting consciousness. Jung posits both a personal and collective unconscious, both of which stand in compensatory relationship to consciousness. The personal unconscious consists of personal, repressed, infantile contents. The collective unconscious contains collective, inherited contents, the instincts and the archetypes. One of Jung's favourite metaphors for the unconscious is that of the sea. With its fluidity, its calms and storms, mermaids and monsters, it can be a force of either creativity or destruction. Jung considers the unconscious is primarily creative, in the service of the individual.

Understanding ― Correlation of Data

Unicorn Tradition ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents holding the teachings of Lady Galadriel, their Founder and Matriarch, especially as recorded in their New Wiccan Book of the Law, as primary or critical parameters of their Spiritual Paradigm. The retention of several core teachings from a Family Tradition that sets the Unicorn Tradition apart from many other traditions of the Craft. In 1976 Galadriel and Athanor met Lady Rhea, a priestess and elder of a Family Tradition, and began taking classes with her in the Atlanta area. Following the end of classes, Galadriel and Athanor moved to Florida. In 1979, the two of them moved back to Atlanta and resumed their training and, under Lady Rhea’s guidance, they began teaching classes. These classes would form what would soon become the Grove of the Unicorn and would later become the basis of the Unicorn Tradition. During a Litha ritual in 1980, Galadriel and Athanor received their Priest and Priestess initiations and the Grove of the Unicorn was officially established. This group was established as an American Eclectic grove blending influences and teachings from the Family Tradition and from the modern Witchcraft revival movement.

Unification of Fields ― While Unification of Fields may refer to the coming together of any type of fields, typically when the term is utilized the reference is to the merging of fields that is possible between the Identity Fields of Individuals, often occurring in the context of sexual activity.

Unified Field Theories ― A Field of Study of or relating to the concept that all the forces in the Consensus Observable Universe are aspects of One Force. These theories and String and/or SuperString Theories and such resultant projections appear quite productive to Metaphysical Inquiry, as the concommitant related Mathematics approaches clarity.

Unitarian ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents holding the belief that God is a unity, not a trinity as a primary or critical parameter of their Spiritual Paradigm. A monotheistic belief which was widespread in the early Christian movement, that God is a unity, not a trinity. The exact nature and makeup of deity occupied the thoughts of many Christians during the first few centuries CE. There were many antiTrinitarian movements at the time: Arianism, Monarchianism, Sabellianism and Patripassianism. A series of church councils decided that God is a Trinity, composed of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Unitarianism then became a heresy and was suppressed.

Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents holding a mixture of Deism, Humanism, Earth Centered Religions (Afro-American religions, Native American spirituality, Wicca, other NeoPagan religions, etc.), Christianity, Judaism, other world religions, prophets, and the direct experience of mystery as primary or critical parameters of their Spiritual Paradigm. The Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations is most commonly called simply Unitarian, but the Unitarian Universalist Association or UUA names are also heard, in any event it is a liberal religious organization, serving the Unitarian Universalist (UU) churches of North America. The Yearbook of American and Canadian Churches estimated a total membership of 502,000 in 1990. The UUA was formed on 1961-MAY-11 from the merger of the Unitarian and Universalist Churches. Unlike other religiously liberal faith groups, UUs are currently expanding in numbers. Before about 1960, UUs were largely considered the most liberal of Christian denominations. Since then, the beliefs of Unitarian Universalists have become quite diverse. In 1995-JUN, the UUA acknowledged that its sources of spirituality are: Christianity, Earth Centered Religions (Afro-American religions, Native American spirituality, Wicca, other NeoPagan religions, etc.), Humanism, Judaism, other world religions, prophets, and the direct experience of mystery.
Fewer than 10% identify themselves as Christians; the organization no longer qualifies as a Christian denomination; it is a multi-faith group. Until recently the UUA was often listed with Christian churches (which probably helped its members at least avoid some of the more overt types of persecution), even though there was no requirement or expectation that members had any beliefs toward or about Jesus or any of the rest of the Abramic package.

According to a 1997 survey of almost 10,000 UUs gave their theological perspective as:
              • Humanist at 46.1% is the most common perspective.
              • 19% identify themselves as Nature or Earth centered religion (e.g. Pagan and or NeoPagan
                  Traditions such as Wiccan, Druid and so forth.)
              • 13% describe themselves simply as Theist.
              • 9.3% self-identify as Christian.
              • 6.2% describe themselves as mystic.
              • 3.6% describe themselves as Buddhist.
              • Other perspectives listed are Jewish at 1.3%, Hindu at 0.4%, Muslim at 0.1% and other at 13.3%
They are certainly a diverse lot! It is obvious that the "glue" that holds congregations together is not a shared theological belief system, as it is in almost all other religious groups.

The 1997 survey also found that the four most important factors are:
              • Shared values and principles: 52.1%
              • Acceptance, respect and support for each other as individuals: 42.5%
              • A desire to take religious questions seriously: 14.6%
              • Commitment to social justice and public witness: 11.5%

Definitions: The term Unitarian has traditionally had two religious meanings: A monotheistic belief which was widespread in the early Christian movement, that God is a unity, not a trinity. The exact nature and makeup of deity occupied the thoughts of many Christians during the first few centuries CE. There were many antiTrinitarian movements at the time: monarchianism, sabellianism and patripassianism. A series of church councils decided that God is a Trinity, composed of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Unitarianism then became a heresy and was suppressed. a religious movement which features a lack of dogma, a belief in the inherent goodness of people, and the obligation for each member to seek out and develop his or her own system of beliefs and ethics. It is this second meaning of Unitarian that we will use here. The term Universalism has also had two religious meanings: The belief that Jehovah as described in the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) is the deity for all humanity, rather than just for the Jews. A religious movement which promoted the concept that every person will go to heaven after death. This is in contrast with the traditional Christian belief that one's natural destination is eternal torment in hell. Only those who are saved will attain heaven. Today, the latter beliefs are still held by some conservative Christians. Other mainline and conservative Christians are drifting toward the Universalist belief. Liberal and most mainline Christians are already there. It is the second meaning of Universalism that we will use here. History of the movement Unitarian Universalists value the teachings of: Origen (circa 185 CE) who stressed Jesus' humanity, and believed that God would receive all people (even demons) into heaven. Jan Huss a Bohemian church reformer and martyr, burned at the stake in 1415 CE. Michael Servetus who wrote "On The Errors of the Trinity" which led to his execution at the stake in 1553 in John Calvin's Geneva for his unitarian heresy. King John Sigismund of Transylvania (now a part of Romania and Hungary) in 1568 issued the first edict of religious freedom. This allowed citizens to hold diverse religious beliefs and still be loyal to the state. Writers, scientists, and others who promoted religious tolerance, including Alcott, Bryant, Holmes, Locke, Milton, Newton, Florence Nightingale, and Thoreau. American politicians such as John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, Adlai Stevenson and William Howard Taft. John Murray, who in 1779 became the minister of the first Universalist church in the U.S. at Gloucester, MA. Joseph Priestly, chemist and Unitarian Minister who established the first Unitarian Church in the U.S. in 1796. Hosea Ballou, author (in 1805) of "A Treatise on Atonement" which argued against the existence of miracles, the Trinity and of Hell. He is sometimes referred to as "The Father of American Universalism". Preachers and theologians Ralph Waldo Emerson, William Ellery Channing and Theodore Parker. Julia Ward Howe, a fighter in the abolition of slavery. Clara Barton, who worked for penal reform. Susan B. Anthony, who advocated women's rights. The first church to call itself Unitarian was established in Transylvania, in 1638. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Universalist groups were formed in England. An organization which was to become the Universalist Church of America was formed in 1785. By 1810, there were 20 Unitarian churches in England. In the U.S., many churches were founded which were Unitarian or professed Unitarian beliefs. Theirs was largely a reaction to the rigidity of Calvinist belief in New England. These churches formed the American Unitarian Association in 1825. The first Unitarian church in Canada was established in Montreal in 1842.

In 1961, the Unitarian and Universalist churches merged to become the UUA. The two religious organizations that became the "UUA" were originally viewed by the public as Christian churches who were defined largely by their heretical beliefs about the nature of God and the afterlife. However a gradual change started during the 19th century and continues today. It is now a multi-faith religious group. Emerson was a powerful force in starting this change. His Divinity School Address emphasized the importance of intellectual freedom and reason. Most modern day Unitarian Universalists share the following beliefs -- that: Each person, because of her/his humanity inherently has dignity and worth. Each person seek his/her unique spiritual path, based upon their personal life experience, the use of reason and meditation, the findings of science and her/his fundamental beliefs concerning deity, humanity, and the rest of the universe. The prime function of a clergyperson and congregation is to help the individual members to grow spiritually. All the great religions of the world, and their sacred texts, have worth. There should be no barrier to membership, such as compulsory adherence to a creed. Their lives, their congregations and association are governed by the concepts of democracy, religious freedom and religious tolerance Much of their effort should be directed towards civil rights, achieving equality of treatment for everyone regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, etc. They have played a major role in these battles for equal rights, in spite of their relatively small numbers.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights ― On December 10, 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights the full text of which appears in the following pages. Following this historic act the Assembly called upon all Member countries to publicize the text of the Declaration and "to cause it to be disseminated, displayed, read and expounded principally in schools and other educational institutions, without distinction based on the political status of countries or territories."

Universal Eclectic Wicca Tradition ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents holding as a primary or critical parameter of their Spiritual Paradigm.

Universal Love ― Universal Love (Love for One's Species, Birth Planet, and the Cosmos)

Universal Unconscious

Universalism ― When used in reference to a MetaPhysical Orientation as to Tradition, Culture or Preferred Flavour, is primarily defined, usually selfdefined by its members and/or adherents holding as a primary or critical parameter of their Spiritual Paradigm.

Universe

Unus Mundus ― When used in reference to the field of Analytical Psychology the "One World". This phrase of the alchemists suggests the interpenetration of spirit , soul and matter. As interpreted in Jung's psychology, it describes the inter-relation of psyche and body. With the development of synchronicity, and the positing of a "psychoid substrate" of reality, this metaphor is carried into the inter-relation of psyche and matter. Jung hoped this would lead to a common ground for psychotherapy and physics.

Ur-Uatchi ― When the term Ur-Uatchi is used in reference to a Mægikal Implement, Sacred Object, Ceremonial Tool and/or Focus it generally refers to a type of Ægyptian Wand, usually with spread wings at the top, Caduceus serpents winding up the staff, and the two Eyes or Uadjets on the Wings, specifically made for general or particular Mægikal Werking, and/or consecrated to the same.

see also: Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci , Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Uranomancy and Uranoscopy ― When the term Uranomancy is used in reference to a type of divination, it generally refers to divination by studying the heavens.

The term Uranomancy is derived from the Greek words: Οὐρανος (Ouranos) meaning sky, heavens, firmament, and Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination.

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Uranus (Local Star System Component) ― see: Œя̇ўĭōṃē

Urimancy Uromancy and Uriscopy ― When the term Urimancy is used in reference to a type of Divination, it generally refers to divination from the observations of urine, the various characteristics, lightness, darkness, bubbles or no bubbles, patterns if the urine is mitriculated onto a rock or smooth earth surface, and to forth could all be considered, as well as any other characteristic. Various forms of Urimancy was frequently used by pregnant women to divine the sex and health of a coming child as well as to determine if an upcoming marriage was to be a good one or not.

The term Urimancy is derived from the Greek words: Οὖρον (Ouron) meaning urine, and Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination,

See also: A general Divinatory System list with short definitions, Divination, Divinatory Systems, -mancy suffix, Μαντεία (Manteia), meaning divination, -scopy suffix, Mægikal Implements, Sacred Objects, Ceremonial Tools, Ritual Apparati, and/or Foci, and Τέλεσμα (Telesma) which is an Ægean 'umbrella' term indicating: any object consecrated for future utility, through specific religious, mægikal, and/or spiritual Werking, and/or through its own intrinsic nature.

Utilitarianism ― When used in reference to a point of view within the field of Ethical, Value and/or Behavioural Matters, this is a Point of View in which the prime parameter for effectuating a course of action is determined by choosing that which is A thing is right when it tends to cause pleasure and reduce pain, it is wrong when it tends otherwise. One of the most widely known and referenced proponents of Utilitarianism is Bentham, J. S. Mill (British).

Notes: The intent of this theory is to emphasize that it is the suffering of sentient beings that is the concern of the moralist. He observed that most human behavior is the pursuit of pleasure and the avoidance of pain, and he created a philosophical system based on this observation, as well as factual claims regarding what kinds of actions tend to cause pleasure, and what cause pain. In the words of Bentham, "it is not whether a being can reason, but whether it can suffer" that defines whether or not a being shall have moral standing; this would dictate how we treat animals as well as humans, and makes no distinction between class, race, species, or gender, which were very revolutionary ideas for his time. When you make a decision, you must calculate how much pleasure and how much pain will result from each possible course of action, and select the option that returns the best result.

Criticisms: In utilitarianism, the ends basically justify the means. If a majority of a nation's population would benefit from the ejection of a minority, such as the Nazi treatment of Jews for example, the balance would come out in favour of the majority's pleasure. It is possible for one to calculate an unjust action returning more general pleasure than pain, however, that's a rare event. Another criticism is the definition of "pleasure". What is pleasure, and what is pain? These are not the simple questions they appear to be. Pain and pleasure are experienced by individuals, and so its definition can become relative. Take for example the case of a masochist who enjoys inflicting wounds on himself; is he experiencing pain or pleasure?

Utilitarians are committed to comprehensive and long-term calculations of pleasure. Egoists may also consider the subject's long-term pleasure; or they may consider that the immediate option which in itself yields or is thought to yield greater pleasure ought to be or is pursued. Some hedonists seem only or mainly to have so-called physical pleasures in mind; others, like John Stuart Mill, have a penchant for the pleasures of civilized discourse. There are clearly, then, many versions of hedonism, and two apparently identical views may, further, turn out to be very different when one considers the proponents' views of the nature of pleasure.

Arguments for hedonism will vary according to type. Psychological hedonists ought to show either that all pursuits are in fact aimed at what the subject takes to yield pleasure; or that we only count as really wanted what the subject either believes will produce pleasure, or is pleased at the prospect of. There is a risk of retreating into the second kind of position whenever the arguments for the first begin to look a little shaky. There is a further risk of moving without notice from points about what the subject thinks will yield most pleasure to points about what they view with most pleasure in prospect, and in general to do the rounds of a variety of explanations in the pleasure family without inquiring whether there is a legitimate route from one to the other.

Evaluative hedonists may be content to describe their end to us in the hope of winning converts. Sometimes it seems that a supposedly familiar morality is taken as given and desirable, and hedonism is propounded, and so defended, as the rationale of our moral thought and practice. This is particularly likely to happen with utilitarianism, which might, it is hoped, be seen both as making sense of what we do and as enabling us to see how to sort out the muddles we get into morally. Most forms of hedonism are egoistic in form and are seen by opponents, and sometimes by proponents, as hostile to traditional morality and Victorian values.

Rationalizing hedonists will tend to invite us, by consideration of examples, to recognize that our criterion of rationality is the presence of a bedrock justification in terms of pleasure. This is usually a version of psychological hedonism applied not to all our pursuits or desires, but to our practice of reflective evaluation.

All long-term versions of hedonism have to face the problem of how pleasure is to be measured. These problems are aggravated if there have to be cross-personal comparisons, as in utilitarianism.
In classical Greece and Rome (hedonism, ancient), the doctrine was in various forms popular and much discussed. It underwent a revival in post-Cartesian philosophy, especially among the British Empiricists, although the most unequivocal hedonist, Helvétius, was produced by the continent of Europe. In Britain it tended either to take a utilitarian form, or to be made the basis of a utilitarian development. A combination of partial truth, general cynicism about human motivation, and confusion of a variety of different familiar explanations of behaviour will probably ensure the recurrent attractiveness of some form of the doctrine.


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Capital A with ring aboveÅ   Capital A with macronĀ   Capital A with breveĂ   Capital A with diaeresisÄ   Capital A with circumflex   Capital A with dot aboveȦ   Capital A with inverted breveȂ   Capital A with tildeà   Capital A with ogonekĄ   Capital AE ligatureÆ   Capital AE ligature with tildeÆ̃   Capital Glottal Stop   Capital Palatoalveolar Click   Regular English AA   Script Capital L   Capital L with macron above   Capital L with dot below   Capital L with stroke, Dark L Ł   Regular English LL   Capital WHω   Capital W with macron above   Capital W with dot below   Regular English WW   Capital Slide H with reverse solidusℋ⃥   Capital H with macron above   Capital H with dot below   Aspirate   Slight Pause   Very Slight Pause   Regular English HH   Capital S with macron above   Capital S with dot above   Capital SH sign   Capital SKΣ   Regular English SS   Hard and Deep Capital DД   High and Light Capital D   Regular English DD   Capital O with ring above   Capital O with macronŌ   Capital O with breveŎ   Capital O with diaeresisÖ   Capital O with solidusØ   Capital OE ligatureŒ   Capital O with Cyrillic Round OmegaѺ   Capital OI   Capital O with ogonekǪ   Capital O with double oo top   Regular English OO   Capital EZJHʑ   Capital Z with macron below   Capital Z with dot aboveŻ   Regular English ZZ   Capital K with macron aboveК̅   Capital K with dot below К̣   Capital Hard KHχ   Capital KHƙ   Regular English KK   Capital V with macron above   Capital V with dot below   Regular English VV   Capital G with macron   Capital G with dot aboveĠ   Capital GNΓ   Capital GRЖ   Capital GWCapital GW   Capital Uvular Voiced ImplosiveϘ   Regular English GG   Capital rolled R with macronЯ̅   Capital rolled R with dot aboveЯ̇   Capital R with macron above   Capital R with dot above   Capital R with ogonek   Regular English RR   Capital C with cedillaÇ   Capital CHЧ   Regular English CC   Capital N with macron above   Capital N with dot below   Capital N with tildeÑ   Capital NGŋ   Capital NG with macron aboveŋ̅   Regular English NN   Capital Y with macron above Ȳ   Capital Y with dot above   Capital Y with yaw aboveЎ   Regular English YY   Capital J with macron aboveЈ̅   Capital J with dot belowЈ̣   Regular English JJ   Capital U with a ring aboveŮ   Capital U with macronŪ   Capital U with breveŬ   Capital U with circumflex aboveÛ   Capital U with diaeresisÜ   Regular English UU   Capital F with macron above   Capital F with dot above   Regular English FF   Capital Q with macron above   Capital Q with dot above   Regular English QQ   Capital B with macron   Capital B with dot below   Trilled BTrilled B   Regular English BB   Capital M with macron   Capital M with dot below   Capital M with tilde   Capital MBCapital MB   Capital MG   Regular English MM   Capital X with macron above   Capital X with dot above   Regular English XX   Capital I with macronĪ   Capital I with breveĬ   Regular English II   Capital T with macron above   Capital T with dot below   Capital TH voicedΘ   Capital TH voicelessÞ   Capital TSЦ   Capital TSCHЩ   Regular English TT   Capital E with macronĒ   Capital E with breveĔ   Capital E with circumflexÊ   Capital schwa Ə   Regular English EE   Capital P with macron above   Capital P with dot above   Capital pTCapital pT   Regular English PP

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